Ghosts Haunt Downtown Evansville And Popular Arts District For Two Spooky Nights Of Family-Friendly…

first_img Phantom Performances Depicting The City’s Richest History, Myths And Fables!  Two nights. Two neighborhoods. Two tours. October 27 and 28, with tours departing every 20 minutes from 6 – 9 pm. Get your tickets for just $15 at the door, or hauntedevansville.com!   Not your average ghost walk! The first annual Haunted Historic Evansville ghost walks in the Haynie’s Corner Arts District and old Riverside Historic District are two unique walking tours with live historical reenactments with Evansville Civic Theatre actors portraying the ghosts of Evansville’s past: Benjamin Bosse, Karl Kae Knecht, Annie Fellows Johnston, George Haynie, and more.The tours promise a dash of thrill, and a twinge of spine-tingling chill, also incorporating accounts of supernatural hauntings and tragic tales from these neighborhoods.The Riverside Historic District tour departs from First Presbyterian Church on Second St.Haynie’s Corner Arts District tour departs from Center of Hope Church on Third St. About Haunted Historic Evansville: Haunted Historic Evansville is a non-profit fundraiser benefitting Haynie’s Corner Arts District Association, Evansville Civic Theatre and Old Evansville Historic Association.Editors Footnote: Title Sponsor: The Dapper PigFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Clinical judgment of doctors not reliable to predict MRH in older adults

first_imgJul 2 2018Medication-related harm (MRH) is common in older adults following hospital discharge. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study has examined whether doctors can predict which older patients will experience MRH requiring care following hospital discharge, and whether clinical experience and confidence in prediction influence the accuracy of predictions.The study found that clinical judgment of doctors is not a reliable tool to predict MRH in older adults post-discharge.In the multicenter observational prospective study involving five teaching hospitals in England between September 2013 and November 2015, there were 1066 patients with completed predictions and follow-up. Doctors discharging older patients from medical wards predicted the likelihood of their patient experiencing MRH requiring care in the initial 8 week period post-discharge.Related StoriesStudy looks at impact of hospital readmissions penalties on targeted surgical conditions’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyMost predictions (85%) were made by junior doctors with less than 5 years’ clinical experience. There was no relationship between doctors’ predictions and patient MRH, irrespective of years of clinical experience. Doctors’ predictions were more likely to be accurate when they reported higher confidence in their prediction, especially in predicting MRH-associated hospital readmissions.”These findings confirm the complexity of predicting medication-related harm.This makes it very challenging to target medication-related strategies to the right individuals,” said Dr. Khalid Ali, chief investigator of the study and senior lecturer in Geriatrics at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. “Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics teaching has not been particularly prominent in undergraduate medical training. This is perhaps an area requiring review, given an aging population that is prescribed ever increasing quantities of medicine.” Dr. Ali added that there is a need to consider new approaches to identify individuals at high risk of medication-related harm given its serious impact on patients and health care services. Source:https://www.bps.ac.uk/news-events/news/articles/2018/can-doctors-identify-older-patients-at-risk-of-medlast_img read more

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