Detainees at Campsfield go on hunger strike

first_imgKathryn Hayward, from Oxford Migrant Solidarity, was critical of the centre, commenting, “Immigration detention is administrative not penal. I do not think that it is necessary, just or humane to indefinitely detain people in centres such as Campsfield House solely on the basis of their purported immigration status, as determined by the UK Border Agency. It is well known that there have been suicides, incidents of self-harm and allegations of abuse at Campsfield House and other UK detention centres such as Yarlswood. I fully support action taken by people in immigration detention to highlight the injustice of their situation and to call for change. The treatment of people in immigration detention is unconscionable and ought to be of concern to us all. It is not an exaggeration to say that fundamental issues of justice, liberty and human dignity are at stake. “Jo Hynes, Oxford Amnesty Secretary, commented, “Immigration detention is a blatant abuse not only of basic human rights, but also of the strong tradition we have in the British justice system that anyone in jail, which is effectively what Campsfield House is, is put before a judge or magistrate before. Immigration detention systematically abuses these rights”.The demonstration also follows Lincoln College JCR passing a motion to condemn Campsfield. Niamh Healy, who proposed the motion, told Cherwell, “I believe that the conditions in which detainees are held in Campsfield – without charge, without time limit, without proper access to legal representation – constitute breaches of internationally recognized human rights. The UK cannot properly fulfill its international human rights obligations while current levels of immigration detention are sustained.The motion that our JCR passed on Sunday asks our Head of College, the Rector, to sign an open letter to the Prime Minister appealing for the early release of Campsfield detainees.”Campsfield House declined to comment. Over fifty detainees at Campsfield House, an Immigration Removal Centre near Oxford, are reported to have gone on hunger strike this Wednesday. A number of students gathered outside the centre on Thursday night to show solidarity with the strikers.According to a press release on the Close Campsfield website, “Once again, detainees at Campsfield are on hunger strike. The hunger strike began this morning (7th May) with the simple demand to close all immigration detention centres in the United Kingdom. Detainees believe their detention is a breach of their human rights”. The strike follows similar action in Harmondsworth migrant prison near Heathrow on Friday 2nd and in Colnbrook detention centre on Tuesday. A spokespoerson for the Campaign to Close Campsfield commented, “Our job is to support the detainees, because their voice is more telling on rare occasions it gets out. We call on all people concerned with basic human rights to support them.”Speaking to Cherwell from inside Campfield, a 27-year-old detainee originally from Pakistan said, “The way we are being treated is a breach of our Human Rights according to organisation such as Amnesty International. I have been kept in the centre for six months — it is like spending half a year in prison when you have committed no crime”.There has been significant student support for the strike, with a number of students demonstrating outside the centre on Thursday evening. Amnesty International Oxford President Rose Brewin commented of the demonstration, “This evening we gathered outside Campsfield detention centre, to show solidarity with those on hunger strike. Members of the campaign to Close Campsfield were joined by campaigners from Bail for Immigration Detainees, Oxford Migrant Support and Oxford University Amnesty International. We had a very positive response from the detainees, who joined in our chants and reiterated their demand for freedom. However, as migrants are held behind 20-foot high fences topped with barbed wire, we were unfortunately unable to see the faces of the people we were talking to.last_img read more

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Philanthropy funds freedom from abuse

first_img Philanthropy funds freedom from abuse Camille Murawski Special to the News “Mary,” an elderly Haitian woman, shyly lifted her loose-fitting dress to reveal scores of scars on her legs. The scars — a result of repeated whippings with electrical cords — ranged from pink to brown, with all shades in between. Mary’s husband, a Haitian native and U.S. citizen, had flogged her mercilessly throughout the course of their decades-long marriage.Mary had filed an I-360 VAWA application, a self-petition to obtain lawful permanent residency. In order to meet the requirements of the VAWA application, Mary had to show proof of abuse from her spouse.Until Mary met attorney Sabrina Salomon, however, the scars had remained a closely guarded secret. Despite the fact that domestic violence is a crime, Salomon said, “Within the Haitian community, it is a custom brought over from that country.”With patience and understanding, Salomon was able to obtain the necessary proof to help Mary become a lawful permanent resident.Salomon is an Equal Justice Works Fellow with the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center in Miami. Salomon, who graduated in 2003 from the University of Miami, was awarded the EJW fellowship to represent low-income Haitian immigrant women and children who are victims of domestic violence. Salomon named her project Nou Kab — Creole for “we can.”“I chose the name,” Salomon said, “because the goal is to empower survivors of domestic violence to take charge of their future and that of their community.”The EJW fellowship is sponsored in part by The Florida Bar Foundation, and Equal Justice Works, a national program for public interest law. Salomon’s project was made possible through a matching donation from Mellon United National Bank in Miami.“Law firms, corporations and banking industry leaders that provide matching funds for these fellowships are supporting highly motivated and gifted young lawyers who undertake specific projects and provide critical legal assistance to the most vulnerable and needy among us,” said Miami’s John Thornton, chair of the Foundation’s Legal Assistance for the Poor and Law Student Grant Committee.Under the direction of Dwight Hill, the bank’s executive vice president, Mellon donated $26,000 to the Foundation for Salomon’s fellowship. Recently, Hill and Salomon met for the first time, and Salomon shared stories of how Mellon’s donation had helped the Miami community.“It was encouraging to know that the money we gave to the cause has had such a good impact,” Hill said.If it had not been for Hill’s decision to fund Nou Kab, Salomon said, Mary and other Haitian immigrants might have gone without legal representation.Salomon said she probably would have joined a law firm or gone into private practice. Her present clients “are very poor, with no income, generally, and big firms typically do not do that kind of work.” And if she had gone into private practice, Salomon said, she probably would not have had the financial capability to do this type of advocacy.Hill became interested in projects like Salomon’s after reading an article about Equal Justice Works in The Florida Bar News. Hill, whose clients comprise a large number of attorneys, called The Florida Bar Foundation and expressed interest in partnering with the program.The Florida Bar Foundation suggested Hill help fund Nou Kab. There were two especially attractive components to her work, Hill said.“This project really appealed to me because, in the Haitian community, there is no other person fighting for them,” Hill said. “They are truly underdogs.”The banker added, because of EJW’s matching funds, “Every dollar has a three dollar impact.” That appealed to Hill’s fiscal sense. Plus, he added, “Every time we can make a difference in the community, it has a ripple effect.”Salomon told Hill of a recent case she had. For 12 years, an abused mother of four had bounced from shelter to shelter. Despite having a limited education and no money, the woman had managed to keep her children enrolled in school. Remarkably, the children had never missed a day of school.“She is a wonderful human being,” Salomon said.The woman came to Salomon for help obtaining employment authorization from the Department of Homeland Security, one of the first steps to acquiring a “green card,” a document indicating permanent resident status. Salomon said it took “about a year” to help the woman obtain employment authorizationJust recently, Salomon said, the woman called and told her she “had a job, an apartment, a phone, and a bank account — the things most of us take for granted.“I had tears in my eyes,” Salomon said. “This woman came from having nothing.“Talking to Dwight, I could tell he was interested,” Salomon said. “Dwight was so genuine in his desire to help. He does not expect this project to bring his bank anything — it’s totally altruistic.”Hill brushed aside the compliments, saying, “We just did what we felt we had to do to help build safer and stronger families.”Hill also encouraged other banks to join Mellon United in its quest to help provide greater access to justice for some of the state’s poorest residents.“I think other banks should do this,” Hill said. “helping fund these projects, we can alleviate some suffering in the community.” Camille Murawski is the communications coordinator for The Florida Bar Foundation and can be reached by calling (407) 843-0045 or e-mail [email protected] flabarfndn.org Philanthropy funds freedom from abuse December 15, 2004 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Thousands of new units proposed for Brisbane has lifted the settlement risk

first_imgIF all the units proposed for the Brisbane market are built there could be increased risk that off the plan buyers can’t settle.WITH thousands of new units still proposed for the Brisbane market concerns are rising that some for settlement risk.New figures from CoreLogic which analyses whether there is a growing risk of off the plan sales not going through have revealed within the greater Brisbane area there are 14,552 units proposed to be built within the next 12 months. Within the next 24 months there are 37,788 new units proposed.CoreLogic analyst Cameron Kusher said the figures measured the potential supply during the next couple of years.He said banks would look at similar data when assessing if they will lend for units in particular areas.A number of major lenders have already revealed they will not lend to buyers of new units in some inner Brisbane suburbs unless buyers have a 20 per cent deposit.Mr Kusher said the figures highlighted the magnitude of the unit construction boom in Australia’s capital cities.“Increasingly, we will see more of the projects not actually commence, or take longer to commence,” he said.’“The average punter in the street needs to factor in that if they are going to buy a unit, there’s an awful lot out there,” he said.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North1 hour agoNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by “So make sure you buy something unique. And remember that it (the volume could have an impact on your property — especially if there is discounting of property values to get sales.”“We are already seeing values fall in Sydney and there’s a lot of talk about oversupply in Brisbane,” he said.Mr Kusher said existing unit owners should really research the market thoroughly if they were looking to sell.“And be realistic about the price, people know about the volume and will be negotiating harder for the sale,’’ he said.For those who don’t already own a property the potential oversupply could be a bonus, Mr Kusher said.’“With a lot of stock coming online into an already well-supplied market, you might be able to buy a property at a price that’s well below what the original purchase price was.”For those who fear they might be in a position to lose money on a purchase, Mr Kusher said the best solution would be time.“Try to hold on to it, and hopefully you have bought something that has a decent rental yield,” he said.last_img read more

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Reality dating show Naked Attraction given the all clear to lay bare on NZ television

first_imgNZ Herald 5 April 2018Family First Comment: Time to scrap the BSA.A reality dating show that features nudity has been given the seal of approval from the Broadcasting Standards Authority.Two episodes of Naked Attraction aired in New Zealand in October and November last year and subsequently 13 people complained to the BSA.The show involves a clothed person choosing a date from six naked people, whose naked bodies are gradually revealed in stages from the feet up. The nudity was not blurred or pixelated in the episodes broadcast.Viewers argued the programme should not have been allowed to air because of the high level of full-frontal nudity and sexual discussion.National Director of Family First NZ Bob McCoskrie was stunned by the BSA’s decision, stating it had “become de-sensitised to what are community standards”.“This decision was a litmus test of whether families can rely on the watchdog to act in the best interests of families and society in general or whether broadcasters have free reign to push the boundaries as far as they want. The broadcasters have won and families have received notice,” he said.“This is all part of the ‘pornification’ of our culture led by broadcasters and advertisers, with the watchdog asleep at the wheel.“Family First was swamped with complaints from families after the broadcasts of Naked Attraction, including medical professionals, horrified by how the standards of free-to-air television have hit rock bottom because of this show.”McCoskrie said the show degrades human relationships to animalistic instinct, and promotes voyeurism and a porn culture.He said a number of advertisers have asked for their advertising to be removed from the programme after being contacted by supporters of Family First.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12026694&ref=twitterlast_img read more

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