Archivist helps families learn fate of missing residential school children

first_imgNellie Hardisty was just a little girl from Moose Factory in Ontario when she disappeared into the morass of Indian residential schools and associated hospitals.She died of turberculosis at the age of 12. None of her family ever saw her again or even knew where the smiling child with the deep dimples had been buried.Decades later, her nephew Logan Jeffries finally held her picture. There they were, those dimples.“I got a little emotional,” he says.“My whole family, my children, my grandchildren, all share those dimples. That’s where it came from. That lady there. My mom always talked about those.”Jeffries spent 12 years looking for his Aunt Nellie. It wasn’t until Aboriginal researchers teamed up with Nancy Hurn, an archivist at the Anglican Church of Canada, that someone placed a file in his hands.“I’ve been an Anglican my entire life,” says Hurn, who has made these posthumous reunions her special task.“The church has lots to account for. I feel my role is living out our apology.”The Truth and Reconciliation Commission says the fate of at least 4,300 children who attended residential schools is unknown.Hurn’s involvement goes back 15 years to when Canada began dealing with the legacy of those institutions. The church’s national archives hold the records of its missionary society, which ran the Anglican schools until they were turned over to the federal government in the 1960s.As churches and the federal government moved toward a settlement and lawsuits mounted, Ottawa needed the names of all students who had attended the schools.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission, formed in 2008, asked for complete records as well. Eventually, hundreds of thousands of records from the Anglican archives — including minutes of meetings, parish records, newsletters and notes from women’s auxiliary groups and chapel registers — were transferred.“As we did that, we realized that there were a lot of students who were identified as having died in the schools,” Hurn says.Her job took on a new aspect.“I was getting requests from a few people about students who never came home and they didn’t know what happened to them.”The commission is compiling a database of all missing children. It expects to have it done by next March.“Even then, I can say for sure we won’t be putting out a definitive list of names,” says commission archivist Raymond Frogner. “It’s a monumental task.”The requests to Hurn haven’t stopped.About half a dozen people a year turn to her to find out how their relatives died and where they are buried. Those requests became a personal mission.“This has to be done,” says Hurn. “It’s so important.”She recalls one woman from Sudbury, Ont., asking if she could find out what happened to her brother.“I said, ‘We’re going to find John.’ And then I thought, what am I saying? I have no idea.“Then I found the records and they had a funeral for him and all the kids turned out and they made a wreath. They sang the hymns. The family was so grateful.”That’s been Hurn’s experience — “the people’s graciousness and the understanding and the acceptance.”“There were a few who were angry at the church and they have every right to be, but mostly they’ve been gracious.”Nothing can make up for the past, says Hurn, who is days away from retirement. But she’s glad she was able to do what she could.“At least I could make a contribution to help them feel like they could heal.”It’s important to know what happened, says Jeffries.“I feel good in my heart that I found my aunt.”Jeffries plans to visit her grave. Put up a cross. Place a few flowers.“It’s closure,” he says.— Follow Bob Weber at @row1960 on Twitterlast_img read more

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Serena Williams Named 25th Seed in PostPregnancy Wimbledon Return

FILE – In this Saturday, July 9, 2016 file photo, Serena Williams of the U.S holds her trophy after winning the women’s singles final against Angelique Kerber of Germany on day thirteen of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Williams has been seeded 25th for the women’s singles tournament at Wimbledon, the All England Club announced Wednesday, June 27, 2018. The 36-year-old American, who has returned to competitive tennis following the birth of her daughter last September, is currently ranked 183rd. The All England Club usually follows the latest ranking list but can make a change if deemed “necessary to produce a balanced draw.” (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)Serena Williams was seeded No. 25 for her return to Wimbledon after having a baby, a decision by the All England Club announced Wednesday that elevates the tournament’s seven-time champion above her ranking of 183rd.While WTA rules allow women who miss time because of a pregnancy to enter events based on their pre-absence ranking, there is no guarantee of a seeding, a policy which has been the subject of much debate in recent months because of Williams’ status. The 36-year-old American gave birth to a daughter last September and was off the tour for more than a year.By moving Williams into the top 32, the All England Club afforded her “protection” from facing any other seeded player in either of the first two rounds — and, of course, allowed the other seeds to avoid facing her that early, too. Williams is a former No. 1 whose 23 major singles championships are a record for the professional era, which began in 1968. She missed Wimbledon in 2017, but won the title the last two times she was in the field, in 2015 and 2016.FILE – In this Tuesday, May 29, 2018 file photo, Serena Williams of the U.S. clenches her fist after scoring a point against Krystina Pliskova of the Czech Republic during their first round match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France. Williams has been seeded 25th for the women’s singles tournament at Wimbledon, the All England Club announced Wednesday, June 27, 2018. The 36-year-old American, who has returned to competitive tennis following the birth of her daughter last September, is currently ranked 183rd. The All England Club usually follows the latest ranking list but can make a change if deemed “necessary to produce a balanced draw.” (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, File)Putting Williams at No. 25 now means that she could face someone seeded No. 1 through No. 8 in the third round.The draw for Wimbledon is Friday; play begins Monday.Wimbledon and other Grand Slam tournaments have leeway to stray from strictly following the WTA and ATP rankings when determining seedings. That’s why, for example, eight-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer’s success on grass courts was taken into account when the All England Club bumped him up a spot to No. 1 on Wednesday, while top-ranked Rafael Nadal is seeded No. 2.When Williams entered the French Open in May, her first Grand Slam action in 16 months, she was not seeded by the French tennis federation. She wound up beating the women ranked No. 11 and No. 17 en route to reaching the fourth round. But because of an injured pectoral muscle, Williams pulled out of Roland Garros before what would have been a showdown against five-time major champion Maria Sharapova.At 17 after her first Grand Slam title, the U.S. Open.The U.S. Tennis Association says it does intend to seed Williams for the U.S. Open, which begins in August. That is part of a new plan, first reported by The New York Times, to take into account if a pregnancy affected a player’s ranking.“Pregnancy will not be penalized,” USTA spokesman Chris Widmaier said. “If Serena Williams enters the 2018 U.S. Open, the USTA will recognize her accomplishments, recognize her return to the workplace and will seed her, regardless of what her ranking is.”One effect of Williams’ being seeded at the All England Club: The 32nd-ranked Dominika Cibulkova, a two-time Wimbledon quarterfinalist and the 2014 Australian Open runner-up, will not benefit from a seeding and could play anyone in the field in the first round.“I don’t think it’s the right thing to do,” Cibulkova told British broadcaster BBC ahead of Wednesday’s seeding announcement. “I think it’s just not fair.”No unseeded woman has won the Wimbledon singles championship. Only two unseeded men have raised the trophy at the All England Club: Boris Becker in 1985, and Goran Ivanisevic in 2001.Aside from the All England Club’s placing of Williams, the women’s seedings align with the rankings. So French Open champion Simona Halep is No. 1, Australian Open Caroline Wozniacki is No. 2, reigning Wimbledon champion Garbine Muguruza is No. 3, and U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens is No. 4.Sharapova is seeded 24th.In the men’s draw, after Federer and Nadal, 2017 runner-up Marin Cilic is No. 3, followed by Alexander Zverev and Juan Martin del Potro. read more

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San Diego Blood Bank celebrates National Blood Donor Month

first_imgSan Diego Blood Bank celebrates National Blood Donor Month Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 8:35 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego Blood Bank (SDBB) is celebrating National Blood Donor Month throughout January by asking people in the community to make a resolution to become regular blood donors and to start by making their first appointment this month.National Blood Donor Month has been observed in January since 1970 with the goal of increasing blood and platelet donations during winter – one of the most difficult times of year to collect enough blood products to meet patient needs, according to SDBB.Coming out of the holiday season, blood banks across the country traditionally see a decrease in donations at this time. High school and college blood drives are on hiatus while schools are out of session for the holidays, and seasonal illnesses, like the flu, may cause some donors to become temporarily unable to donate.“With the holidays behind us, we’re asking our community to help keep our blood supply at a safe level,” says Dr. David Wellis, San Diego Blood Bank CEO. “There is no substitute for blood – donations are needed now.”In celebration of National Blood Donor Month, SDBB will feature stories from blood donors, transfusion recipients and blood bank staff throughout the month of January on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.To be eligible to donate blood you must be at least 17 years old, weigh at least 114 pounds and be in general good health. For more information on National Blood Donor Month or to make an appointment, visit www.sandiegobloodbank.org or call 1-800-4MY-SDBB. Posted: January 2, 2019center_img KUSI Newsroom January 2, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

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