Building design: Towering achievement

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Yankees activate Domingo German to pitch against Mets

first_imgFollowing Tuesday’s game, the Yankees optioned LHP Stephen Tarpley to @swbrailriders.Prior to tonight’s game, the Yankees returned RHP Domingo Germán from rehab and reinstated him from the 10-day IL.— New York Yankees (@Yankees) July 3, 2019New York optioned left-hander Stephen Tarpley to Triple-A in a corresponding move. MLB trade rumors: Mets open to moving Todd Frazier, Jason Vargas German, 26, had been on the 10-day IL since June 7 with a hip flexor strain. He struggled in his lone rehab start last Thursday, allowing four runs over four innings, but the Yankees seem to think he’s ready to return to the mound. Related News MLB trade rumors: Astros unwilling to move this prospect in deal for Tigers’ Matthew Boyd MLB wrap: Yankees’ home run streak comes to an end in loss to Mets Before his injury, German was 9-2 with a 3.86 ERA, 1.11 WHIP, and 77/19 K/BB ratio in 70 innings this season.Despite being plagued by injuries, the Yankees have dominated in the American League with a 54-29 record heading into Wednesday’s play. They are atop of the AL East and are tied for the most wins in the league with the Astros, behind only the NL-best Dodgers (58-29). Domingo German is back in the Yankees rotation.The right-hander has been activated off the injured list and is scheduled to pitch Wednesday night against the Mets, the team announced.last_img read more

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‘Scared’ Arsenal grateful for a point at bottom Watford

first_imgHowever, the Spaniard refuted Xhaka’s suggestion that his side were scared.“Maybe that is (his) individual feeling. I think in football you never should be scared and you have to take that moment. We need to be strong in our mentality.”Emery is clearly still trying to find the right balance between his brilliant attack and shoddy defence.Mesut Ozil was recalled to his starting line-up for the first time since he and Sead Kolasinac were the victims of a carjacking attack in July.Ozil initially struggled to settle as Watford started the brighter with Cleverley’s rising drive forcing Bernd Leno into a fine save before Jose Holebas fired horribly off-target with a great chance from the edge of the area.However, Watford have now conceded 10 goals in their opening five games to the campaign and were opened up far too easily to allow Aubameyang to open the scoring on 21 minutes.The home fans were screaming for a foul as Dani Ceballos won back possession, but Watford were slow to react as Kolasinac burst down the left and fed Aubameyang, who spun and fired low past Ben Foster.It was soon 2-0 after a 20-pass move. Ozil freed Ainsley Maitland-Niles in behind the Watford defence and the right-back squared for Aubameyang to slot home his fifth goal in as many games this season.However, Arsenal unravelled after the break to miss the chance to climb up to third.A point sees the Gunners move level with Manchester United, Tottenham, Chelsea and Leicester behind Liverpool and Manchester City in the early season battle for a top-four finish.And it could easily have been worse for Arsenal as Deulofeu sent an effort inches wide and Cleverley’s fierce drive was deflected over by Luiz as wave upon wave of Watford attack continued even after equalising.But is was Abdoulaye Doucoure who squandered the best chance of all for a winner deep into stoppage time when he shot too close to Leno with just the German goalkeeper to beat to leave Watford still bottom of the Premier League table.“Second-half I am really happy with the reaction,” said Sanchez Flores. “It’s very difficult to do what they did against Arsenal.”Share on: WhatsApp Watford Arsenal London, United Kingdom | AFP | Arsenal captain Granit Xhaka admitted the Gunners were lucky to escape with a point after blowing a 2-0 lead to draw 2-2 at bottom-of-the-table Watford on Sunday.Quique Sanchez Flores enjoyed a happy return as the Hornets manager as Tom Cleverley and Roberto Pereyra’s penalty secured a thoroughly merited share of the spoils.Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang looked to have the Gunners well on course for a comfortable three points when he struck twice in 11 minutes before the break.However, Sanchez Flores, who was appointed as Hornets’ boss for the second time last week after one point from their opening four games of the season saw Javi Gracia sacked, roused the hosts for an impressive second-half fightback.“We came out and played such a bad second-half. You have to say we are happy to take a point,” said Xhaka.“We were scared in the second-half. We knew they would come at us and push us hard but we have to show more character and not be scared.“We have spoken about it. We cannot give a performance like this in the second half.”Arsenal played a huge part in their own downfall as they were consistently caught in possession on the edge of their own box, trying to play out from the back.That was how Watford got a foothold back in the game as Sokratis Papastathopoulos’s pass was intercepted inside his own box by Gerard Deulofeu and the ball broke to Cleverley to fire home eight minutes into the second-half.“They controlled the match with their pressing, causing us (to make) some mistakes. Scoring the first goal gave them confidence to continue that,” said Arsenal manager Unai Emery.“That is the moment we needed calm and control.”last_img read more

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Half-time: Brentford 0 Rotherham 0

first_imgBrentford were fortunate to reach half-time without conceding after Rotherham missed a string of good chances at Griffin Park.Matt Derbyshire and Richard Smallwood had their best opportunities, both put clean through but shooting straight at David Button, who returned to the Bees side in goal.Brentford started poorly, with youngster Jack Barmby shooting straight at Button in the second minute and fellow debutant Adam Hamill also missing the target from distance.And the Bees remained sloppy in possession throughout the half, with James Tarkowski’s superb last-ditch tackle needed to stop Derbyshire firing Rotherham ahead after Harlee Dean’s misplaced pass.Andre Gray had the ball in the net for Brentford but it was ruled out for offside, while Stuart Dallas’s header towards goal was blocked by teammate Jonathan Douglas on the line.Dallas and Douglas returned to the side as well as Alex Pritchard, who fired two shots wide just before the break, one of which was a free-kick.Brentford (4-3-2-1): Button; Odubajo, Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; Douglas, Diagouraga; Jota, Pritchard, Dallas; GraySubs not used: Bonham, Craig, Saunders, Tébar, Toral, Smith, YennarisFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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St. Bernard’s, Del Norte to travel for NorCal Regional games

first_imgThere’s no better time to be playing high school football than in December.It is the month where state champions are crowned.Both St. Bernard’s and Del Norte, winners of North Coast Section title games over the weekend, will get the opportunity to advance to a state championship game on Friday when both teams take part in NorCal Regional playoff games — the de facto semifinal-round of the state playoffs.St. Bernard’s (10-3) will face East Nicolaus (12-1) in the Division 6-AA bowl game at …last_img read more

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90% local music on radio gives upcoming musicians hope

first_img17 May 2016Local producer Jemaine Roberts said the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) decision of playing 90% local content will give musicians an opportunity to make a living creating music. With 18 SABC stations required to follow the proclamation, Roberts hoped that overlooked musicians will be getting the airplay they deserve and that their creativity warrants. Jemaine RobertsIt gives hopeRoberts, producer at Hyper Nova Productions in Johannesburg, explained artists were demotivated because radio stations would not easily accept their work. “Now radio is forced to play mostly local music, so that gives artists new hope and they feel like they can make a living by doing what they love.”Roberts, who has been a music producer for 12 years, said it was tough to earn money as a musician because radio stations preferred playing international artists or established locals. This meant that South Africa did not develop a live music culture that would expand the market for new musicians.“As South Africa we are still growing the music industry – much slower than the rest of the world – but we are getting there. In the [United] States or the United Kingdom, it’s easier to make a living from live gigs and internet content.”He said that 90% local music on radio is an amazing initiative. “It will definitely benefit me as a producer directly because now artists have something to work towards and I can facilitate that process. Now artists can finally earn money this way via Southern African Music Rights Organisation.”Roberts has worked with artists such as Joyous Celebration, Revamp Nation, Brenton Goldman and CJay.ImplementationThe announcement was made by SABC’s chief operations officer, Hlaudi Motsoeneng on Wednesday and the following day – Thursday 12 May 2016 – SABC radio stations implemented the 90% local music decree.Those radio stations cater to a variety of genres, but have a special focus on Kwaito, Jazz, Reggae and Gospel.Veteran musician Don Laka said in an interview with the SABC that they are also planning road shows to promote local music.Watch Laka and SABC Head: Group Communications, Kaizer Kganyago talk about the initiative:Copyright control Billy PaulsonBilly Paulson, musician and founder of the Northern Arts Festival in Port Elizabeth said he has been thinking about running his own radio station, just so that he could play only Proudly South African music.Paulson cautioned the pros and cons were not carefully considered. “The two things the industry must now teach artists is the importance of quality, and secondly we need more copyright control.’The announcement is good, he said, but it is just the beginning of educating local musicians. “[It is] no use you are played 10 times and your royalty statement does not reflect accordingly.”Paulson grew up in the industry. “I wrote my first song in 1974. In 1984 I had my first hit called Step by Step. I earned a mere R47 in royalties.”He said he had released More Sal Die Son Weer Skyn in 1994. “To date it is performed on albums that I am not even aware of. I do not earn royalties off these guys. Nobody teaches artists that you cannot just record another man’s tune and not pay,” he said. Churchil NaudeChurchil Naude, a Mitchells Plain born rapper said that currently radio stations like KSFM in Parys, in the Free State plays his music. “Here in Cape Town it seems that there is a buddy system. Some local radio stations that target the Coloured market, don’t even play music done by Coloured musicians.”He said that he hopes that the 90% local music on SABC radio stations does not only play a limited amount of artists.The feedbackRadio listeners shared their opinion on Twitter:#AfricaMonth & the SABC takes a progressive decision of playing 90% local (African) music across it’s 19 radio stations. #TheAfricaWeWant— Clayson Monyela (@ClaysonMonyela) May 11, 2016So good. RT @RiahCPP: Our music is good ???? 100% local enjoying it @bonang_m #TFR— Bonang B* Matheba (@bonang_m) May 12, 2016Thank you 90% #LocalIsLekker just heard PitchBlackAfro and #H2O pic.twitter.com/C0P4LCwRuw— Gorila (@saulak) May 12, 2016Television contentAccording to a press statement, from 1 July 2016, the SABC will increase its local content offering on television. “Recently the SABC encouraged independent and emerging producers through a successful engagement, to approach the corporation with fresh proposals and content,” reads the statement.“The SABC looks forward to receiving contributions from all over the country. To support this initiative commissioning editors will be appointed in all the provinces at the various SABC offices.”Local music fillers will also be used between programmes.last_img read more

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Feed alternatives allowed by a corn, soybean and wheat rotation that includes cows

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I know I’ve shared this story before, but considering the weather we experienced across much of Ohio the first half of summer, it’s appropriate to tell it again. Dad was a mechanic for a local farm implement dealer. Once while out on a combine service call in mid summer he asked the farmer if he’d gotten all his hay made. The response — in a deep German accent — was, “Yes, it got made . . . but it rained so much I never got it baled.”Despite that being the case in many parts again this year, and then followed by a very dry late summer, the fact is that we still have an abundance of feedstuffs available that will maintain beef cows cost effectively if managed and supplemented properly. Over the years we’ve spent a lot of time in this publication discussing the planting of small grains and annual forages in late summer and fall for supplemental forage. With over 400,000 acres of wheat harvested in Ohio this year, the opportunities were huge for producing additional forages on those acres.Today, let’s discuss a couple more of the opportunities that remain. With Ohio farmers in the midst of harvesting more than 3 million acres of corn, the potential for the brood cow feed supply being extended well into fall by utilizing crop residue is huge. Corn crop residue is practical for feeding dry, gestating beef cows in mid gestation providing they have average or better body condition. Managed correctly, one acre of corn residue can yield up to 60 animal unit grazing days (60 days of grazing for a 1,000 pound animal). It’s also the perfect crop to utilize while stockpiling perennial forages throughout the fall.Grazing “efficiency” will determine exactly how much feed is realized from corn residue. Moveable electric fencing can increase utilization up to 50% by allowing cattlemen to control the amount of area grazed thus, preventing the cattle from “selective” grazing or “trampling” many of the leaves or husks. “Strip” grazing the cows will also reduce the potential for acidosis in situations where there may have been excessive field losses of grain. Simply “dumping” the cows onto the entire corn field will be least efficient but will allow more residue to remain on the field over the winter for cover. Cattle will select and eat the grain first, then the husk and leaves, and finally the cobs and stalks.Fields containing corn residues should be grazed soon after harvest for optimum quality, and fields with poor drainage or compaction concerns should not be grazed over extended periods of time. Producers with a Conservation Plan should check with NRCS to be certain that the grazing of corn stalks does not violate the Plan.If corn stalk fields are not presently fenced, temporary electric fencing is an economical alternative. Depending on the size and layout of the field, harvested corn fields can be encircled with a single strand of poly or high tensile wire supported with fiberglass posts for perhaps $10+/- per acre. Even if a fence charger must be purchased to allow the grazing of corn residue, up to 45 days per acre of feed may be provided a typical Ohio brood cow at a cost of under 25 cents/head per day. And, of course, the materials purchased to provide this temporary boundary may be reused from year to year, thus, making the “annual” cost of ownership even less.While corn residue offers a considerable amount of digestible energy and fiber, it’s always good to review the palatability and practicality of utilizing the crop residues that result from either corn or soybean harvest as a significant feed source, especially if they must be mechanically harvested and transported for feeding.Despite the fact that Ohio will harvest over 5 million acres of soybeans this fall, of the two residues, certainly soybean stubble bales must be viewed as a last resort unless you have a bale processor and feed it in limited quantities to “dilute” other high quality feeds in the ration. In fact, if the vision for utilizing soybean residue is simply placing bales of the “feed” in bale feeders, it’s probably not worth the time, fuel, wear on the machinery, and effort it takes to gather it.While it can have 35% to 40% TDN and nearly 4% protein, this is less than even wheat straw (review an earlier article linked here by Steve Boyles on feeding straw). Simply put, as soybeans increase in maturity they increase in lignin and lignin is not digested well in the rumen. Soybean stubble might make marginal bedding, but twigs gathered from the trees in the yard could make a comparable feed.While corn residue has much more merit than soybean residue as a feed source and may be viewed as comparable to average grass hay, palatability of the stalks can be a problem. When it comes to baling and transporting corn residues, consumption versus waste becomes a consideration worth pondering. The husk, leaf, and any kernels in the bales will likely make up less than one third of each bale, but as suggested earlier will be readily consumed. If a bale processor is used, that might allow many of the stalks to be more palatable.However, when simply placing corn residue bales in bale rings, the abundance of corn stalks that will remain after the more desirable parts of the bale are consumed will likely become bedding. If you must feed baled corn residue in bale rings, consider simply pushing the chopper or spreader on the back of the combine forward and dropping the residue that comes through the thresher in a “windrow” and then bale only those windrows. The resulting bales will be a much higher percentage of the palatable portions of the corn residue.As one considers baling and transporting baled corn residue to brood cows, carefully consider the harvest and transportation costs involved on a “per consumable and digestible ton of dry matter” basis. Keep in mind that a bale of crop residue seldom weighs the same as the same size bale of hay. In many cases, simply feeding shelled corn may be more cost effective.Also, as one carefully considers the economics of harvesting and hauling corn residues, keep in mind the fertilizer nutrient value being removed from the corn field and possibly left in a pile at the bottom of a bale ring. According to past OSU Extension fertility specialist Robert Mullen, when you remove a ton of corn crop residue from a field you’re taking with it 6 pounds of P2O5 and 25 pounds of K2O which should be replaced or redistributed to the field. Soybean residue would remove only slightly less.Corn stover also contains organic matter that when returned to the soil does have value, but it is difficult to put a dollar value on it. Continued removal of a significant portion of corn crop residue may have a negative impact in the long-run in the form of decreased soil organic matter, especially if some organic matter, perhaps in the form of manure, is not returned to the soil.Grazing corn crop residue can prove to be a valuable feed and soil friendly. However, carefully consider the pros and cons of mechanically harvesting and transporting the residue to the cow herd. I think you’ll find the bottom line is pretty simple . . . managed grazing is by far the best way to utilize corn residue, and if you’re looking for feed, soybean stubble probably isn’t worth the effort or expense it takes to harvest or transport it.last_img read more

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TweetUp Acquires Twidroid & Popurls

first_imgThe Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Twitter-based advertising platform TweetUp has announced this morning that it has acquired all of Tomatic’s current projects, which include both popurls and twidroyd.The acquisition will provide TweetUp with both a new platform to distribute its sponsored search results as well as a new source of relevant search results.TweetUp (not to be confused with a “tweetup”, which is a real-life meeting of Twitter users) is a search and advertising service for Twitter that lets users bid to make their tweets appear higher in TweetUp searches. According to the site, it “combines sophisticated relevance algorithms with a bidding system to raise your profile to the top of search results and make it easy for you to acquire new followers”.If you’re unfamiliar, popurls does what it sounds like – it provides a listing of the most popular URLs from across the Web, from social link aggregators Digg and Reddit to Flickr and yours truly. In its own words, popurls “is the dashboard for the latest web-buzz, a single page that encapsulates up-to-the-minute headlines from the most popular sites on the Internet”. Twidroyd, renamed from “Twidroid” to avoid any legal issues with Lucas Films, is one of the top Twitter clients for the Android mobile platform and “will come standard on millions of upcoming Android phones from five of the leading handset manufacturers”, according to today’s release. TweetUp CEO Bill Gross had the following to say in the release:Acquiring Twidroyd provides TweetUp with a number of strategic advantages. Twidroyd is widely considered the best Twitter client for Android phones and it leads In market share, so its growing base of users will be a valuable source of well-informed feedback on TweetUp search on mobile devices. In addition, the popurls website, which attracts users looking for a convenient guide to the most popular sites, news, videos and blogs on the Internet, will be a natural spot to display TweetUp search results and gain user feedback. This combination should enable us to more rapidly refine our offerings, generating better user experiences for distribution partners and for users searching for the world’s best tweeters regardless of their choice of devices.The details of the acquisition were not disclosed in today’s release. The company claims that today’s deal “will bring TweetUp search results to more than 40 million unique users per month and serve more than 100 million impressions per month.” Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…center_img Tags:#news#twitter#web mike melanson A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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Forget “Brand Conversations” on Social Networks

first_imgklint finley Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#enterprise#Products IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Nowcenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Related Posts Douglas Rushkoff spoke at Pivot, a conference on branding, last year and recently linked to a video of his talk. It’s worth watching if you’re involved in social CRM or any other sort of social business.For the first approximately 20 minutes of the talk, Rushkoff rants about the corporatization of the Internet and summarizes his book Life Inc. He explains the origins of the modern corporation during the mercantilist period of European economic development, and how branding came about as a means to put a friendly face on mass production. But during the final 10 minutes, Rushkoff gives some practical advice to companies trying to make sense of the social Web.Rushkoff thinks branding is irrelevant in the age of the social network. He compares social networks to the original bazaars and marketplaces of the past. The bazaar was the center of commerce, gossip, political debate and more. He says that people weren’t interested in “branding” then – they were interested in exchanging factual (or supposedly factual) information.Rushkoff gives the example of the Carl’s Jr. advertising campaign in which Paris Hilton ate a cheese burger while washing a car. Rushkoff says that even though this campaign was considered a “viral success,” sales at Carl’s Jr. actually went down while the ad was circulating. People were sharing the video on social networks, but it didn’t translate into sales for the company.On the other hand, he says, social media has proven to be an effective medium for damage control. It’s a good way to spread information (I would add that it’s also a good way to spread misinformation). He says actual information, and not branding, is the currency of social networks.He takes another example of corporate branding: the Keebler Elves. He says the elves were created to keep people from thinking about how Keebler cookies were actually made. He says no one is going to talk about the Keebler Elves on social media, but they might talk about the ingredients used in the cookies and whether they’re organic or what the environmental impact of the product’s packaging. In other words, people will talk about the actual product, but not the mythology.Rushkoff says branding has no future, but products might if the people making them are willing to engage their customers honestly through social media.I’m always surprised how much the contemporary debate over social CRM and social engagement sounds like The Cluetrain Manifesto, which was written way back in 1999. Whether its authors are right or wrong, they were clearly ahead of their time.Thesis number 11 of the manifesto is: “People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information and support from one another than from vendors. So much for corporate rhetoric about adding value to commoditized products.” That sounds like Rushkoff’s thesis in a nutshell.What do you think? Is branding finished?last_img read more

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Canadian First Nation Gets Active About Passive Housing

first_imgLike many First Nations in Canada, the Yale First Nation has struggled to provide its members housing that withstands southwestern B.C.’s nine months of rain without breaking the bank.Yale receives a maximum of $169,000 from the federal government to build a house. That’s enough for a single-family, wood-frame house or, as Yale First Nation Chief Ken Hansen calls them, “B.C. box houses.”The houses meet the basic B.C. building code. But that’s not saying much. Such “stick-built” on-site houses can take six months to a year to put up, so long as the Yale area’s frequent rain delays co-operate. And even when complete, the to-basic-code structures are drafty. Lingering moisture leads to mould and rot.Nonetheless, Yale has built 14 “B.C. box houses” of three or four bedrooms each for rent to members in three different reserve communities. Those tenants pay for the structures’ poor quality on an ongoing basis, said Crystal Sedore, housing manager for the Yale First Nation: “In the winter, we have a couple of houses that are over $200 a month to heat.” Keeping it affordableWhile CMHC funding differs by location, the Yale First Nation’s maximum of $169,000 per housing unit, while enough to build family-sized homes to the province’s basic building code, doesn’t generally cover the additional costs of Passive House construction — estimated to be 10% to 15% more than conventional units with similar interior finishings.The Yale First Nation negotiated to bring costs down by replacing carpet with linoleum and not including furniture. In the end, the projects came in exactly within the federal government’s budget, Sedore said.All 10 units in the two buildings will be two-bedrooms. The one-story units in the four-plex will rent at $375. Rents for the market-rate townhouses in the six-plex have yet to be set, but Sedore estimates they will be between $525 to $600 a month.Many will be occupied by single tenants currently living in family housing that’s too big for them, Sedore said. While not every tenant is pleased with that exchange, she adds, it will allow some of the 16 families currently on Yale’s rental housing wait-list to move back to their community. (Yale is also renovating existing rental units, including making them more energy efficient.)Feedback from membership and the band’s ad hoc housing committee on the project’s design has been “amazing” so far, Sedore said. Most of the excitement has to do with the buildings’ look and feel, not their Passive House aspect, Sedore admits. But she attributes that to a lack of appreciation so far for the difference between energy-efficient and conventional design.“I think once we get tenants in and they start to see those real savings,” she said, “they’ll be really happy to see this brought onto reserve.”And if modular Passive homes can deliver on their promise of cheaper, faster, healthier housing in Yale, other communities in Canada might be happy to see some of those savings, too. RELATED ARTICLES A House for Really Cold WintersCanada Launches Net-Zero ProjectPassive House Finds Friends in CanadaCanada’s Northernmost PassivhausIs Passivhaus Right for a Cold Canadian Climate? Editor’s note: Yale First Nation is a community in British Columbia, Canada, of some 160 members. This post originally appeared at The Tyee.center_img Turn on the lights to stay warmPassive House is a home designed to be so energy-efficient that it can stay warm at 17°C (62.6°F) with residents’ body heat, energy from the sun, and turning on the lights.Like net-zero energy housing, Passive Housing relies on strict construction standards and material specifications to ensure as little heat seepage as possible.That means more insulation than standard building codes require, triple-glazed insulated windows that face the sun to take advantage of nature’s heating system, and a heat-recovery ventilation system to ensure fresh air cycles through the house while maintaining internal temperatures.Homes meeting Passive House standards require up to 80% less energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the same amount, compared to conventionally built houses. That’s significant not only to tenants’ pocket books, but also in helping meet Canada’s national emission targets. Twelve percent of our greenhouse gas emissions come from buildings.A rendering of one of two Passive House projects planned at Yale First Nation in British Columbia, Canada. The units will rent for less than $600 per month. (Image courtesy Britco)Britco boasts that their previous Passive House project, in Bella Bella, B.C., takes as much energy to heat on the coldest day of the year as turning on six 100-watt incandescent light bulbs.For the Yale First Nation, that same performance means significant savings.“We’re looking at hydro bills estimated to be $10 to $20 a month for heating and electricity” in these new units, Sedore said. Yale will track the two complex’s energy use and share the data, providing a valuable test case for modular Passive House designs in other communities, regardless of whether or not they’re Indigenous.“I’m hoping to lead by example,” said Chief Hansen. For many tenants, that’s a lot of extra money to come up with. Often it falls to the band to bail them out by paying the bill. “It’s just one more thing that the band should not really be doing, but we have an obligation to make sure that our membership has heat and hydro,” Sedore said. “So we do it.”So when the band decided to invest in building some new rental housing, they knew what didn’t work. What were needed were homes that would cut down on energy costs, withstand the wet climate, and be suited to singles and smaller families.That led Yale to Langley, B.C., in the Vancouver suburbs, and to Britco, a modular building company. Yale contracted Britco to build 10 two-bedroom units in a pair of buildings that meet the high-efficiency Passive House design requirements.A six-plex in Ruby Creek reserve just south of Hope, B.C. is expected to welcome its first tenants at the end of January. Construction on a smaller four-plex is slated to begin this spring in either the Stullawheets or Dogwood reserve north of Hope.“For us, the appeal was not only are we being environmentally conscious, which is very important to our chief and council,” Sedore said, “but also to build housing that is beyond minimal acceptable standards. We want something better, and our membership deserves better.” Fewer construction risksBest known for its bright orange trailers used as offices or first aid centers on construction sites, Britco expanded into affordable housing seven years ago. After the 2010 Winter Olympics, it re-assembled modular units it had originally supplied for the Games’ staff accommodation into a total of 156 affordable housing units in six buildings in Chilliwack, Surrey, Enderby, Chetwynd, Saanich and Sechelt.The company’s first Passive House development was the one in Bella Bella: six town homes built for Vancouver Coastal Health staff. From conception to finish, the whole project took seven months in 2015 — highlighting one way that modular housing differs from conventional on-site “stick built” construction. Building the same structure the old-fashioned way, subject to the weather, might easily have taken up to a year.Modular housing is built off-site under more controlled conditions. Britco does the majority of its construction inside an Agassiz warehouse where it takes 30 days to complete one unit of Passive Housing, with multiple units under construction at the same time.“It’s probably a half to a third the time of stick-built [construction],” Sedore said. In fact, Yale’s units could have been delivered in as little as three months, she says, if Yale First Nation had been the sole sign-off on funds. As it was, waiting for funding approvals from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC) extended the whole process from signing the contract with Britco to moving in new tenants, to six months.Hansen said the nation met with and considered other modular home providers in B.C. and Ontario, but it was Britco’s relationship with indigenous communities that tipped the scale in its favor.Company President Obie Erickson is well known in the Yale community, which sits on traditional Yale First Nation territory. “They engage First Nations and they do it in a proper manner,” Hansen said.The company partners with First Nations on projects, employment and skills training, and has donated modular buildings to remote Indigenous communities for use as libraries.last_img read more

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