Trojans escape with win

first_imgWith six of nine players suiting up in cardinal and gold for the first time, the USC men’s basketball team looked to identify its strengths and weaknesses during the season opener Friday night at the Galen Center.Offensively, in the 66-59 win over Cal State Northridge, the USC guards struggled against the Matadors’ zone defense. Trojan guards converted just six of 29 shot attempts, including zero shots from behind the 3-point line, and committed a combined 11 turnovers.Shining star · In his USC debut, redshirt sophomore forward Dewayne Dedmon led the Trojans to victory with 16 points and nine rebounds. – Chris Pham | Daily TrojanThe Trojans (1-0) did manage to work the ball into the post, however, scoring 30 of 66 points in the paint. In his USC debut, redshirt sophomore forward Dewayne Dedmon scored 16 points and grabbed eight rebounds, while junior forward Aaron Fuller recorded 16 points and nine rebounds.After 40 minutes of action, however, USC basketball coach Kevin O’Neill could not define his team’s offensive identity.“I still do not know,” O’Neill said. “For the third year in a row, we have a new group, and this is the newest group that we have had.”Defensively, the Trojans held the Matadors (0-1) to a 13.8 shooting percentage in the first half, establishing a new USC opponent record for the lowest shooting percentage in a half. For the game, USC made 42.6 percent of its shots, compared to just 25 percent for CSUN. The Trojans, however, struggled with foul trouble. Four of the five USC starters were called for three or more fouls.“We did a relatively good job defensively for most of the game,” O’Neill said. “Our guys think this is a kung-fu match. That is not toughness. That is not smart basketball.”The Matadors struggled on the offensive end to begin the game, making only 1 of 19 field goal attempts. The Trojans took advantage, jumping out to a 14-4 lead to start the game behind eight points from Dedmon.Dedmon, however, picked up his second foul with 8:02 left in the opening half and remained on the bench until halftime. The Matadors managed to cut the lead to four points, but Fuller scored seven of his nine first-half points with Dedmon sidelined to send the Trojans into the locker room leading 29-21.USC extended the lead to the nine points in the second half, but with Dedmon limited after picking up his third foul and suffering a cramp in his right leg, the Matadors battled back to tie the score at 42, and eventually take their first lead of the game at 52-50.Sophomore guard Maurice Jones, who only shot 2-of-13 from the field in the game, got to the free throw line down the stretch, making nine of 11 free throws in the second half. He finished with 16 points and three assists.“We were rudderless until [Jones] took over in the last four minutes and went into attack mode,” O’Neill said.Jones, the captain of the squad and who has played the most minutes at USC despite only being a sophomore, scored seven of the Trojans’ final 14 points to clinch the victory.“[CSUN] did a good job keeping their composure, but we also did a good job keeping ours,” O’Neill said.With two 7-footers, junior center James Blasczyk and Dedmon, in addition to the 6-foot-6 Fuller, the Trojans enjoyed a significant height advantage. USC had 11 more rebounds than CSUN, and six more blocked shots, led by Dedmon, who recorded three.“Coach wants the ball in the post so that we can make a play or find the open guy,” Fuller said.Freshman guards Alexis Moore and Byron Wesley made their collegiate debuts. Moore struggled with his shot, finishing 1-of-9 from the field, including 0-of-7 from the 3-point line, and ended the night with six points. Wesley had five points and eight rebounds.Senior walk-on guard Eric Strangis, starting for the first time, scored USC’s first two points of the season on a jump shot 36 seconds into the game. The basket was his first career points as a Trojan after appearing in six games and recording seven total minutes last season.The Trojans are back in action tonight at home against Nebraska at 7:30 p.m.In the last matchup of the two teams, in November of last year, USC held a 20-point lead in the first half before falling 60-58 in Lincoln.The Cornhuskers (1-0) return four starters from the team that went 19-13 last season. The only active Trojans that competed in the game against Nebraska last season are sophomore forward Garret Jackson, Jones and Strangis.“Right now we are nowhere near where we need to be to play the kind of schedule that we are playing,” O’Neill said. “But we are going to get better and improve.”last_img read more

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Speculation over the futures of Chelsea’s Zouma and QPR’s unwanted winger Hoilett

first_imgA round-up of the latest transfer speculation involving Chelsea and QPR…Roma want to buy Kurt Zouma from Chelsea for £25m, according to the Sunday People.Roma coach Rudi Garcia is said to have put Zouma top of his list of potential replacements for Alessio Romagnoli, who has joined AC Milan.The Italian club would apparently be keen to sign Zouma on loan if a permanent deal cannot be agreed.There has been speculation about the player’s future in light of Chelsea’s attempts to sign Everton defender John Stones.Zouma impressed when he featured for Chelsea last seasonThe Sunday Express say Everton have lined up River Plate’s Ramiro Funes as a possible replacement for Stones.The Daily Star Sunday, which claims Paris St-Germain could make an approach for Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho, say Everton have identified Swansea and Wales centre-back Ashley Williams as a potential replacement for Stones.The Star also believe Chelsea have had a £5m bid for Brazilian left-back Alex Telles rejected by Galatasaray.And Metro pick up on reports in the Italian media that Chelsea want to sign Napoli striker Gonzalo Higuain.Meanwhile, Sunderland, Bournemouth and German club Borussia Monchengladbach were interested in QPR’s Junior Hoilett but have been put off by his wage demands, the People claim.There is again speculation that QPR goalkeeper Rob Green could return to his former club West Ham, this time by the Star,Follow West London Sport on Twitter Find us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Glenn Harsh, Sept. 10

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest They were talking that we could get 4 to 5 inches in this area. We got 3.5 inches out of the whole thing. It was plenty dry so the rain is not hurting anything and it will help all those who planted cover crops before the rain. And for those of us who didn’t, it is always nice to put cover crops out on wet ground anyway. It gets a better start with moisture there.We didn’t get the cover crops in as early as we wanted to. The whole industry is pretty tight on triticale and cereal rye seed, which kind of delayed things a little bit. In places where we were going to use cereal rye we actually will use barley, which I think will be as good or better for early seedings. As you get into later seedings you have to watch barley because it can heave on you a little more when it doesn’t get its roots down deep enough. I think the new crop of cereal rye will help with the seed supply issues this month.The later soybeans still have a fair amount of green leaves on them and the rain will help finish out those top beans and add weight to the whole plant. That rain will still help some if they still have a lot of green tissue.Having multiple days of rain certainly can lead to concerns with corn quality, though. I am sure it will be location specific as to where it creates problems or doesn’t. It depends on how far along the crop is, how tight the husk cover is and how much water gets down in there. There will definitely be a difference in varieties. Time will tell.There are some beans getting ready. I have a field that is not too far off. I think it will definitely be ready by Farm Science Review.last_img read more

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Update on a Wood Chip CHP Plant for Brattleboro

first_imgA little over a year ago I reported on the efforts of a local organization, Brattleboro Thermal Utility (BTU), to develop a wood-chip-fired “combined heat and power” (CHP) plant for the town. In that column I reported that BTU, on whose board I sit, was trying to identify a company to carry out a preliminary feasibility study for the project; we were also seeking funding for that study.Funding for the feasibility study was received from Vermont’s Clean Energy Development Fund, with some matching support from the Town of Brattleboro. The Exeter, New Hampshire firm, Waldron Engineering and Construction, was identified to carry out the study, with the Biomass Energy Resource Center in Montpelier, Vermont providing additional technical input. Results of that study are now in, and I’ll provide a brief summary here.First, a little background on CHP. With conventional power generation in North America, a heat source, such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear fuel is used to create steam, which spins a turbine, generating electricity. Water, usually from a river or lake, is used to cool the steam, condensing it back into water. Only about a third of the “source energy” in the fuel is actually converted into useful electricity; the rest is lost as waste heat–warming the river.With CHP, waste heat is captured and distributed (through a piping network) as useful thermal energy for space and water heating in buildings and for industrial processes. This approach is common in Europe, especially in Scandinavian countries. In Brattleboro, the hope is that wood chips can be used to operate a CHP plant, with the heat then distributed to buildings and industrial facilities in the downtown area and along the more densely developed corridors in town.With the feasibility study, BTU wanted to figure out the approximate thermal energy needs in Brattleboro and get a sense of the economics of a wood-chip CHP plant. A key question we needed to answer was whether the plant should be designed and operated primarily for its electrical output (“electric leading”) or for its thermal output (“thermal leading”). An electric-leading CHP plant would have a more consistent year-round revenue source (electricity sales), but it would be necessary to get rid of the excess heat when there isn’t demand for that heat–such as in the summer. A thermal-leading plant would be operated at full capacity only when there is demand for heat, so there isn’t a need to get rid of unwanted heat, but the revenue is much more variable.So, what did we learn?Waldron initially created an economic model to compare these two plant configurations (electric-leading and thermal-leading). During the course of the study, the company added a third, “hybrid” option: a thermal-leading plant in which 90% of the energy would be supplied by wood chips and the remainder from oil-fired boilers.The 15 megawatt (MW) electric-leading plant that was modeled would burn about 240,000 tons of wood chips per year (about 30 truckloads per day) to generate $14 million in electricity sales and $3.1 million in thermal sales. The total cost of this option, including the cost of a hot-water piping system to distribute heat, would be about $89 million.The thermal-leading plant would burn 29,000 tons of wood chips per year, producing heat for 1.6 million square feet of buildings, along with 1.6 MW of electricity. This much smaller plant would generate $590,000 per year in electricity sales and $2.4 million in thermal energy sales. The total cost of this option would be about $27 million.The somewhat larger hybrid wood-oil thermal-leading plant that was modeled would burn 32,000 tons of wood chips per year, producing heat for 2.0 million square feet of buildings and 1.9 MW of electricity. This plant would generate $6.3 million in electricity sales and $3.7 million in thermal sales with a total system cost of $24 million. This hybrid option is less expensive because the wood-chip boiler would be sized to provide “baseload” heat, rather than “peak” heat; the oil boiler(s) would fire to satisfy peak heating demand. The hybrid option also provides greater security, by having two heat sources.While the BTU organization remains very excited about this project, it is not a “slam-dunk” in terms of the economics, though the economics would improve significantly if the cost of oil goes up (for this study $2.40 per gallon was assumed) or if funding is received for a portion of the capital cost. BTU and the town will be examining the results of the feasibility study carefully, gauging the sustainable wood chip supply regionally, considering different ownership models for both the CHP plant and the heat-distribution piping network, determining what funding mechanisms exist for the system, and looking at various sites that could be used for a plant.For more information, keep an eye on the Brattleboro Thermal Utility website.I invite you to share your comments on this blog. You can also follow my musings on Twitter.last_img read more

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Draft is next up during NBA’s dizzying days of deals

first_imgMarkelle Fultz, center, speaks with reporters after his private workout with the Los Angeles Lakers at NBA basketball team’s training complex Thursday, June 15, 2017, in El Segundo, Calif. (AP Photo/Greg Beacham)NEW YORK—Markelle Fultz is ready for the NBA draft. He’s already learned about life at the trade deadline.During a dizzying few days of deals around the NBA, the presumed No. 1 pick had his Saturday plans – not to mention his future destination – change when the Philadelphia 76ers brought him in for a workout. They then completed a trade with the Boston Celtics and are expected to take the Washington guard to begin the action Thursday night.ADVERTISEMENT Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken And if the last few days are indication, what follows might be a wild night inside Barclays Center.“It’s been a little crazy last couple days,” Duke forward Jayson Tatum said Wednesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTeams seem to have one eye on the draft and future stars like Fultz and Lonzo Ball, while the other is firmly focused on jockeying for proven veterans. Former and future No. 1 picks have already been dealt this week in what feels like the trade deadline, free agency and draft all rolled into one frenzy.“It just shows you what the NBA is about. I mean, you can get traded in the blink of an eye, without knowing,” Fultz said. “It just shows you how this business is and like I said, I just go with the flow. I’ve got an opportunity to play basketball and that’s all I ask for.” World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Alaska re-ups Henton for PBA Governors’ Cup Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games From there it could be Tatum, Josh Jackson of Kansas, Kentucky’s De’Aaron Fox or some other player in the mix at No. 3, where the Celtics will now pick after the deal with the 76ers. Celtics President Danny Ainge said after making the trade he thought he could get the player he wanted two spots lower.“It’s a very loaded class and I feel like especially whichever guys go at the top four, five, there may not be that much separation between (them) because everybody’s just so talented,” Tatum said.Many of them, as usual lately, are freshmen. A record 14 were taken in the first round of last year’s draft and that number should be threatened Thursday. The Sacramento Kings have two top-10 picks, while NBA champion Golden State and runner-up Cleveland have none in the first round.Teams chasing those two squads may make up ground quickest with a veteran player they can only get through free agency or a trade, so that may have to wait until July.But they should be able to find someone good Thursday.“This, I think, has a chance to be a historic draft,” Minnesota Timberwolves general manager Scott Layden said. “You look at the top end of the draft and I think there’s a chance that there’s going to be a lot of very good players, but it also runs deep into the late first round. I think that’s why there will be a lot of activity at this draft, because I think teams see potential to get a great player.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garagecenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES View comments Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken What ‘missteps’? MOST READ 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire Though Fultz heads what’s widely regarded as a strong draft class, the young stars have had to share the spotlight this week with veterans who are – or could be – on the move. All-Stars and Olympic champions such as Paul George and Jimmy Butler are front and center in trade talk that usually isn’t this heavy until February. Dwight Howard was dealt and D’Angelo Russell – who just two years ago was on the same stage the players will walk Thursday as the No. 2 pick – was dealt by the Los Angeles Lakers, presumably to clear the point guard spot for Ball and salary cap space for the future.“I’ve been seeing a lot of crazy things. They’ve been coming through my phone with the ESPN app,” Kentucky guard Malik Monk said.“I knew right before the draft something crazy was going to happen. It happens almost every year, so I wasn’t shocked about it.”Things are expected to settle down a bit for at least the first two picks. The 76ers, selecting first for the second straight year, should take Fultz before Magic Johnson takes Ball with the Lakers again in the No. 2 spot, which is exactly what the UCLA guard and his father, LaVar, want.“It would mean a lot to play for my hometown and learn from the best point guard ever,” Ball said.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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10 months ago​Burnley boss Dyche to stick with back-three against Arsenal

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Burnley boss Dyche to stick with back-three against Arsenalby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSean Dyche has admitted that he will continue with a back three for Burnley’s upcoming clash against Arsenal.The Clarets changed up their formation against Spurs at Wembley, but lost 1-0 to a stoppage time goal from Christian Eriksen.They were solid defensively and may continue the same setup against the Gunners this weekend.”I think it’s something we would consider again, we didn’t just do it for a gimmick, we did it because we thought it could be effective,” said Dyche to the Lancashire Telegraph. “In many ways, it was. The hardship when you come to these places is then being effective on the attacking side – how many times can you get that real moment of truth to open them up?”We had a few, but it is difficult. We limited them by their standards.”They are a top side and I think we’ve delivered a performance that has made it very tight, and they have had to work incredibly hard to get something from the game.” last_img read more

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Archivist helps families learn fate of missing residential school children

first_imgNellie Hardisty was just a little girl from Moose Factory in Ontario when she disappeared into the morass of Indian residential schools and associated hospitals.She died of turberculosis at the age of 12. None of her family ever saw her again or even knew where the smiling child with the deep dimples had been buried.Decades later, her nephew Logan Jeffries finally held her picture. There they were, those dimples.“I got a little emotional,” he says.“My whole family, my children, my grandchildren, all share those dimples. That’s where it came from. That lady there. My mom always talked about those.”Jeffries spent 12 years looking for his Aunt Nellie. It wasn’t until Aboriginal researchers teamed up with Nancy Hurn, an archivist at the Anglican Church of Canada, that someone placed a file in his hands.“I’ve been an Anglican my entire life,” says Hurn, who has made these posthumous reunions her special task.“The church has lots to account for. I feel my role is living out our apology.”The Truth and Reconciliation Commission says the fate of at least 4,300 children who attended residential schools is unknown.Hurn’s involvement goes back 15 years to when Canada began dealing with the legacy of those institutions. The church’s national archives hold the records of its missionary society, which ran the Anglican schools until they were turned over to the federal government in the 1960s.As churches and the federal government moved toward a settlement and lawsuits mounted, Ottawa needed the names of all students who had attended the schools.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission, formed in 2008, asked for complete records as well. Eventually, hundreds of thousands of records from the Anglican archives — including minutes of meetings, parish records, newsletters and notes from women’s auxiliary groups and chapel registers — were transferred.“As we did that, we realized that there were a lot of students who were identified as having died in the schools,” Hurn says.Her job took on a new aspect.“I was getting requests from a few people about students who never came home and they didn’t know what happened to them.”The commission is compiling a database of all missing children. It expects to have it done by next March.“Even then, I can say for sure we won’t be putting out a definitive list of names,” says commission archivist Raymond Frogner. “It’s a monumental task.”The requests to Hurn haven’t stopped.About half a dozen people a year turn to her to find out how their relatives died and where they are buried. Those requests became a personal mission.“This has to be done,” says Hurn. “It’s so important.”She recalls one woman from Sudbury, Ont., asking if she could find out what happened to her brother.“I said, ‘We’re going to find John.’ And then I thought, what am I saying? I have no idea.“Then I found the records and they had a funeral for him and all the kids turned out and they made a wreath. They sang the hymns. The family was so grateful.”That’s been Hurn’s experience — “the people’s graciousness and the understanding and the acceptance.”“There were a few who were angry at the church and they have every right to be, but mostly they’ve been gracious.”Nothing can make up for the past, says Hurn, who is days away from retirement. But she’s glad she was able to do what she could.“At least I could make a contribution to help them feel like they could heal.”It’s important to know what happened, says Jeffries.“I feel good in my heart that I found my aunt.”Jeffries plans to visit her grave. Put up a cross. Place a few flowers.“It’s closure,” he says.— Follow Bob Weber at @row1960 on Twitterlast_img read more

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