Nicaraguan Police Increase Operations against Wave of Violence in Caribbean

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first_img “We are going to conduct police missions to search and capture those individuals suspected of being highly dangerous criminals in the area,” Chief of Police Aminta Granera stated during a public ceremony. The Nicaraguan Police will conduct special operations in four municipalities in the northeastern Caribbean part of the country to confront the wave of violence and homicide that left at least 19 dead in the remote region during the last month, an official source reported. “We are going to conduct police missions to search and capture those individuals suspected of being highly dangerous criminals in the area,” Chief of Police Aminta Granera stated during a public ceremony. Nicaragua has the lowest violence rates in Central America, with 11 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants. However, there are areas on the Atlantic coast where the numbers are three times the national average. The chief of police acknowledged that the job will be “difficult due to the distance,” since the RAAN is the biggest region in the country, with 32,159 km². For surveillance, the police forces have 318 members working in difficult-to-reach communities through jungle and mountain areas. At least 19 people have been murdered in these towns since July 15, including a reporter. On August 6, General Julio Avilés, head of the Army, said that violence had increased due to “setting of scores” as a result of problems of coexistence. However, local authorities believe that it is due to the scarcity of police presence. Granera said that due to the situation, law enforcement presence was increased since August 6, when more police officers were deployed and more police checkpoints were setup. Nicaragua has the lowest violence rates in Central America, with 11 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants. However, there are areas on the Atlantic coast where the numbers are three times the national average. The Nicaraguan Police will conduct special operations in four municipalities in the northeastern Caribbean part of the country to confront the wave of violence and homicide that left at least 19 dead in the remote region during the last month, an official source reported. The chief of police acknowledged that the job will be “difficult due to the distance,” since the RAAN is the biggest region in the country, with 32,159 km². For surveillance, the police forces have 318 members working in difficult-to-reach communities through jungle and mountain areas. On August 6, General Julio Avilés, head of the Army, said that violence had increased due to “setting of scores” as a result of problems of coexistence. However, local authorities believe that it is due to the scarcity of police presence. Granera said that due to the situation, law enforcement presence was increased since August 6, when more police officers were deployed and more police checkpoints were setup. The goal is to “try to disrupt criminal groups” operating in the mining municipalities of Rosita, Siuna and Bonanza, as well as in the cattle-raising area of Mulukuku, the four areas in the North Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAN), 500 km to the northwest of the capital. The goal is to “try to disrupt criminal groups” operating in the mining municipalities of Rosita, Siuna and Bonanza, as well as in the cattle-raising area of Mulukuku, the four areas in the North Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAN), 500 km to the northwest of the capital. By Dialogo August 09, 2013 At least 19 people have been murdered in these towns since July 15, including a reporter. last_img

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