The greatest occupy story ever told

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Occupy Movement Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Doug Desper says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Comments (4) Steve Grech says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab December 17, 2011 at 6:04 pm What Steve G says is true. If more pastors and church workers had to provide for themselves as the Apostle Paul did to keep himself fed and clothed as a Tent Maker, there would be more sympathy for the middle class who are able to borrow from the rich to start their business, to enlarge their business, to employ those who are willing to learn the skills needed to be employed. It is not the fault of the rich or the middle class that people make wrong choices in learning the wrong things that make them useless to a potential employer. In Jesus’ time, even the Priests had to learn a trade, develop work skills, in addition to book learning. The disciples knew the craft of fishing, business; Jesus knew carpentry and stone mason work. These OWS people need to go back to school, learn a vocational trade, and get into the work force, and get off this “welfare attitude of everyone owes me a living”, and expect everyone to provide them a living while they are in the parks living in squalor with their laptops, i-pads, and cellphones. The Episcopal Church and others in the Religious community should be promoting “we will help you learn a trade if you want free food”. Nothing wrong with that. The Salvation Army says If you want a bed and supper, you have to go to chapel first. And it works for them and no one has a line of lawyers at their door protesting. Should work for us in the Episcopal Church. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. [Episcopal News Service] The Occupy Baltimore encampment was dismantled recently. Police in riot gear evicted 40 or so protesters. There were no arrests. It was a peaceful end to a mostly peaceful demonstration. What the Occupy protests are about has confused some, but TIME magazine seems to think these demonstrations, coupled with the Arab spring events, are important enough to make “The Protester” its person of the year.In church, as in society, there have been mixed reactions to the Occupy protesters. Some have called them hippies, bums, or worse. Some said they should spend their time getting work, becoming productive members of their communities. Others said they had no idea what moved folks to take up residence on the streets, some for months, to make their point. To be clear, economic justice is the reason for these Occupy protests – as was much of the ministry of Jesus.Many efforts to end these protests took place during our celebration of Advent. We have been waiting, anticipating, hoping for one more time to get it: what does it mean for God to occupy human nature? This incarnation of God in human form is the heart of the Christian story and that calls us to live our lives differently.Biblical accounts around Jesus’ birth focus on peace and good will or glad tidings. Sometimes overlooked is that the first witnesses were shepherds, a lowly and somewhat despised class of folks. It was a wandering couple seeking shelter to have a baby that an innkeeper directed to a barn. The creator of the universe begins occupying human form in a dirty, dusty, unsanitary stable. Certainly an inhospitable birth place for any human, let alone the savior of the world. Or so we think.Throughout his life, Jesus identifies with the poor, prisoners, the oppressed, widows and orphans. His visit to a Nazareth synagogue early in Luke’s gospel gives us a pretty good indication where his heart was when he chose to read from Isaiah 61: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.”Lately I’ve begun wearing my red “Solidarnosc” lapel pin from the Polish trade union uprising in the ’80s. I see this as a way to be in solidarity with those who have occupied city parks and streets to call attention to economic injustice in the world. I see it as a way to support clergy who have been chaplains to the protesters. And it makes me think at this time of the coming Incarnation of God that Jesus would be with those who do not share justly in God’s bounty.As Christmas comes again, I think we need to ask ourselves where Jesus would be in our community today. Where would Jesus choose to become incarnated? And how should we be in solidarity with Jesus; the Jesus born in a barn, who always championed the poor and oppressed, who overturned tables protesting a Temple system discriminating against those who had little?If we claim our role as Christ’s hands and heart in this world, if we allow Jesus to occupy us body, mind and spirit, then maybe we should not be afraid to champion the cause of Occupy protesters and find Jesus this Christmas with those seeking an end to economic injustice in our world.— The Rev. Canon Dan Webster is canon for evangelism and ministry development in the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ December 17, 2011 at 11:25 pm Not long ago Canon Webster asserted in essence that Jesus changed his mind about the worth of a person by the continued insistence of the pleading Canaanite woman. During the commentary it was asserted by Canon Webster that Jesus began referring to the woman as like a “dog” but then became more enlightened as He got to know her. (That reading of the Scripture was perplexing by its first assumption that Jesus began as a bigot, became enlightened, and change then His mind. – BTW: Could it be instead that Jesus tested the faith of the woman by referring to her in terms that she was already used to, and then showed how instead the Son of God embraced her?) Canon Webster’s reading of Scripture again today suggests that one begins with human experience which will then illuminate Scripture, even to the point of defining God, which is a dangerous and often erroneous and misleading. Looking at other comments here I would add that in the rush to listen to the culture some of us have often fallen into the mire of what Jesus Christ came to redeem us from. I am fairly sure that while Jesus would identify with those who want greater justice He would likewise rail against those in the Occupy Movement who: defecate on the streets, steal from each other, abuse drugs, rape and molest, yell at parents with children as they try to inch their way to Wall Street daycares, and on it goes. Listen to the culture, yes, but do not fall into the mire that needs to be redeemed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL January 29, 2012 at 3:04 pm Ms. Kopec,Are these the types of people that do NOT make up the Occupy Movement? (Read on) –By NBC NewsStory updated 12:30 p.m. ET on Sunday, January 29th:Oakland officials on Sunday were inspecting damage inside City Hall that was caused by about 50 Occupy protesters who broke in and smashed glass display cases, spray-painted graffiti, and burned the U.S. and California flags.The break-in on Saturday was the culmination of a day of clashes between protesters and police. At least 300 people were arrested on charges ranging from vandalism and failure to disperse.At least three officers and one protester were injured.Mayor Jean Quan said Occupy protesters have caused an estimated $2 million in damages from vandalism since October. She said the cost to the city related to the Occupy Oakland protests is pegged at about $5 million.OK – are they part of the Occupy Movement or not? Just some usual Oakland street activity? Hardly. Sounds like a lot of anarchists more intent on destruction than anything else. How can Occupy claim that they are speaking for and helping the 99% when the actions of the Occupy Movement are costing the 99% millions in fees, resources, taxes, and destroyed property? I think that the Prayer Book quotes the 10 Commandments, especially…”Thou shalt not steal”. I can think of no greater theft in Oakland yesterday than for Occupy to pick the pockets of the community to pay for the destructive self-indulgence by the ones who are “just there to help”. Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Steve Marlow Macon-GA says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Advocacy Peace & Justice, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA December 17, 2011 at 2:28 pm I have been an Episcopalian for over 30 years. It is this kind of drivel which is causing the Episcopal Church to lose members and become irrelevant. A few points:1. The shepherds were working! They weren’t hanging around chanting silly slogans. The shepherds had responsibility unlike the protesters who had the means to do absolutely nothing for weeks on end and still be supported (anyone know about the pizzas shipped into Zuccotti park? How about the donated latrines? etc).2. Sorry, Reverend, but Jesus also identifies with the rich, the homeowners and the business people, not just what you consider poor. Jesus came to ALL PEOPLE. In your little world described above, you place Jesus in a nice little box.3. You wear a pin from the Polish uprisings to show commonality? Are you kidding me? Let’s see, the occupiers in the US have raped women, shot each other, threatened reporters and spouted numerous anti-semetic rhetoric. Lech Walesa, the father of Solidarity, is a staunch Roman Catholic and very pro life. Hmmm maybe you should rethink the whole “pin thing”.4. Economic injustice? Who is holding those kids back? I say kids because they are immature like children. They can go to work just like everyone else and work their way up. I’m sure they are able to search for jobs on the mac books and i-phones they were using.5. Your thesis limits Jesus to the occupiers. How about the businesses which were shut down? Wouldn’t Jesus be walking with them? No? Why not? The business owners are employing people and were forced to lay those people off because of your occupiers.Bottom line is this Reverend: Jesus is for all-not just the politically correct. The sooner you and the Episcopal Church realize this the sooner relevancy will return. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Doug Desper says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group By Dan WebsterPosted Dec 16, 2011 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The greatest occupy story ever told Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

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FLORIDA: Mandi’s Chapel named top religious building by AIA

first_img Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY Mark James says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Mandi’s Chapel has been as been recognized by the Florida Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.[Diocese of Florida] Mandi’s Chapel, the cherished centerpiece of the Episcopal Diocese of Florida’s Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, has been recognized by the Florida Chapter of The American Institute of Architects, AIA Florida.Given in memory of Mandi Petway by her parents, Betty and Tom Petway, Mandi’s Chapel has been named the top religious building, and ranked second overall building, in the AIA Florida “Florida Architecture: 100 Years. 100 Places” competition. Betty and Tom Petway were thrilled with this news, stating, “We appreciate this special honor and well deserved recognition for Mandi’s Chapel, John Zona, AIA, and The Camp Weed and Cerveny Conference Center. Mandi’s legacy continues to shine through this special tribute.”Mandi’s Chapel serves as a visual and spiritual cornerstone of the diocesan gathering space. Members of the diocese claim the space as transforming in their spiritual development.“Mandi’s Chapel is at the spiritual heart of the Diocese of Florida, providing, as it does, a place of worship, beauty, and tranquility in the midst of our beloved Camp Weed and Cerveny Conference Center,” said Diocesan Bishop Samuel Johnson Howard. “This AIA tribute is an acknowledgement of the enormous gifts of architect John Zona and of the generosity of Mandi’s parents and family, which have come together in this special place to the glory of God.”Zona designed the glass-walled chapel to be a public, yet sacred place, which appears to float between lake and sky. Another Zona design, The Baughman Center at the University of Florida, finished number three overall in the competition, in which more than 2.4 million votes were cast. The public was encouraged to vote online to choose among 100 Florida structures identified by AIA Florida as the best in architectural achievement.St. Paul’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, in Jacksonville Beach, a landmark sweeping ocean-wave design which replaced a smaller Diocese of Florida worship space, was second among the five top buildings as voted by architects. That congregation’s historic original building has been preserved as part of the Beaches Museum and History Center. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Apr 19, 2012 Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET April 19, 2012 at 2:31 pm Congratulations to SPBTS! It is truly a unique building. Who’s ever seen a church that looks like a wave?! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC FLORIDA: Mandi’s Chapel named top religious building by AIA St. Paul’s by-the-Sea, Jacksonville Beach, second of top five Florida buildings Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

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Western Massachusetts announces candidates for 9th bishop

first_imgWestern Massachusetts announces candidates for 9th bishop Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Diocese of Western Massachusetts] The search, transition, and standing committees of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts on April 19 announced a slate of five candidates for ninth bishop of the diocese:The Very Rev. Richard A. Demarest, 55, dean, St. Michael’s Cathedral, Boise, Idaho (Diocese of Idaho)The Rev. Dr. Douglas John Fisher, 57, rector, Grace Church, Millbrook, New York (Diocese of New York)The Rev. Nancy Gossling, 60, rector, St. James’ Church, Glastonbury, Connecticut (Diocese of Connecticut)The Very Rev. Ron W. Griffin, 58, rector, Christ Church, Eureka, California (Diocese of Northern California)The Very Rev. Mark B. Pendleton, 49, dean, Christ Church Cathedral, Hartford, Connecticut (Diocese of Connecticut)All candidates will be in the Diocese of Western Massachusetts for four public gatherings during the week of May 21.The election of the ninth bishop of Western Massachusetts is scheduled for June 2 at Christ Church Cathedral, Springfield. Because the election falls within 120 days of the start of the July meeting of the Episcopal Church’s 77th General Convention, the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies must consent to the bishop-elect’s ordination.Pending consents, the bishop-elect will be ordained Dec. 1 at the MassMutual Center, also in Springfield.Information about the candidates is here. A website with information about the search process and transition is here.The Rt. Rev. Gordon Paul Scruton announced in June 2011 that he would retire in December 2012, after 16 years as the diocese’s eighth bishop. Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Apr 19, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Elections, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing House of Bishops Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

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Calls to study, change Episcopal Church structure abound

first_img Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group General Convention 2012, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing May 3, 2012 at 1:29 pm Please increase the size of the font used for this news. It is simply too small to be read easily by these (80) old eyes. I don’t wear glasses to read. The EPC needs to redesign all of these new sites with a larger font size. Thanks for looking into it. Structure May 3, 2012 at 11:01 am Your suggestion returns us to the days of the metropolitan bishop in which the diocese included the church he pastored and a VERY limited number of parishes with a limited distance. I agree with your proposal. The internet and other “connection” electronics will solve much of the problems you address. Fr. George Stamm says: May 3, 2012 at 9:07 am Amen, Doug Cn. Mort Ward says: May 18, 2012 at 8:20 pm I don’t think change will come soon to a church in which the majority of congregations gathered for worship look like a room full of Q-tips. Q-tips who still wish for the return of the King James Bible, 1928 Prayer Book, still fight about how to refer to God, still don’t want women, gay, lesbien, or transgendered people as their clergy.It is kind of hard to change people who still hold on to the notion that “God loves everyone (who looks like me).” After all, most Q-tips already have their own denomination. Calls to study, change Episcopal Church structure abound General Convention Blue Book reports offer range of theories, solutions Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET May 4, 2012 at 12:40 am As a prescient former Archbishop of Canterbury once said: “A church that lives for itself will die by itself.” As a considerably less well known and wise American Anglican bishop also said much later: “Show me an institution that is preoccupied with restructuring itself, and I’ll show you an institution that is dying.” (Oops! I guess that was me!)The “Motherhood and APPLE Pie” boiler plate in the article above is fine as far as it goes but it’s not yet demonstrably going anywhere. We need specific – and sacrificial – decisions to back it up to carry it forward into the Kingdom of God! Following are a few suggestions in the light of the basic reality that … The Episcopal Church is not “ours” except through God’s exercise of stewardship, it is first God’s and we must – through PRAYER, THOUGHT, and SACRIFICE – determine what God wants His/Her Church to be like; at least in that part of God’s Vineyard over which we have been granted stewardship.The Episcopal Church has never been the church of the 99% and probably never will be. We may be “Catholic” in out heritage, tradition and theology, but we will never be an all-inclusive (i.e. “Catholic”) church in terms of our human makeup, except insofar as we seek the Peters, Andrews, Jameses, Mary Magdalenes, Marthas and Simon of Cyrenes of our own time and place to join equally with us in the mission of our Pauls, Lukes, Joseph of Arimathias, Nicodemuses, and John the Divines which seem to be more characteristic of us. The Church of England, as well as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, in centuries past tried that – largely unsuccessfully – despite the POWER of “the Establishment” behind them, as well as the efforts of British Evangelicals and the Oxford Movement. “The sun has almost set on us”, if we’re to follow the Anglo-American Empire around the world, as in Scottish missionary David Livingston’s “Culture, Commerce and the Cross”. But, “fear not”, as Jesus said, the Church is still alive and well in our midst; the Roman Empire isn’t!But WHY? … and HOW? … and WHAT do we preach once we know to whom to preach? The GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST? Of course! But what is it?“POWER”, as we know the word today, shouldn’t even be in our vocabulary, but “AUTHORITY” must be! PRAY, THINK, … to the point of SACRIFICE! A few SACRIFICIAL ideas …1. DO WE NEED 11 SEMINARIES (3 of the largest being within 200 miles of one another in the northeast; another two within about 300 miles of NYC) and countless interdenominational opportunities for ministerial training PLUS innumerable diocesan ordination training programs? There is some good and sensible progress in the mid-west through the recent detente of Bexley Hall and Seabury Western with a bit of CDSP thrown in.) BUT REALLY, THREE IN THE SOUTH and ONE on the West Coast? Only one is slightly subsidized by the Episcopal Church; General Theological Seminary in NYC. WHY NOT PUT ALL OUR EGGS IN NO MORE THAN FOUR GEOGRAPHICAL BASKETS like Berkeley-Yale, Sewanee. Bexley-Seabury and CDSP and a couple of special-interest places for the more extreme believers in our fold, like NASHOTAH and TRINITY.2. While we’re on the subject of education, there are SEVEN EPISCOPAL CHURCH-RELATED COLLEGES in the continental United States still intentionally or legally related. (When I was bishop, one of my Canons told me that she had a daughter that had graduated from one of them and that after four years as an athlete and honor student, SHE DIDN’T REALIZE THAT IT WAS RELATED TO THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH!) WHY don’t we either “fish or cut bait ” with these institutions which – with the exception of the three “Historical Black Colleges” and, perhaps, St. Augustine’s (Hispanic oriented) College in Chicago – receive NO regular support from the Episcopal Church. WHY NOT ask them if they want to continue identification with the Episcopal Church and, if so, give some seminary-bound students some support, in return for a more intentional church connectedness on on the part of the colleges. (We’d probably loose some of them – and, thereby, some prestige, but so what? We should no longer think of ourselves in the “prestige” business but in the business of education for ministry, as the Episcopal Church and its colleges originally were. [The same principle might apply to the member schools of the growing National Association of Episcopal Schools.]3.- A. WHILE WE’RE AT IT, WHAT ABOUT THE ACTUAL LEADERSHIP OF THE CHURCH? WHY does a church that claims to be serious about “LAY MINISTRY” really need all these priests and deacons? WHY do the canons require that a “Rector” be a “Priest”? WHAT IF – like the Orthodox Jews, Disciples of Christ, Mormons and others, can’t lay leaders, respected by the congregation (who often do more for the church’s mission than the Rector does- and are non-stipendiary!) be ordained to the priesthood to serve regularly only in that congregation, leaving the preaching, teaching and pastoral ministries to a specially trained (by whatever process approved by the bishop) person who could be called “Canon,” “Archdeacon” (if ordained to the diaconate), “Commissioner,” “Monkey” or anything you like.3-B. AND WHAT OF OUR DIOCESES AND BISHOPS? 110 domestic dioceses for 1,500,000 people who “call themselves Episcopalians? That’s one diocese for every 120,000 people (minus the ordained?) with some as small as 1600 people. WHO ARE WE TRYING TO KID … Maybe ourselves? Does Province I need 7 dioceses or could 3 do as well, or better: 1 for Northern New England (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont – c. 20,000 communicants where the distance from Portland, See City of Maine to the diocese’s farthest congregation is greater than that from Portland to NYC – c.64,000 communicants, one for Central New England (Massachusetts & Western Massachusetts – c.64,000 communicants) and one for Southern New England (Connecticut and Rhode Island – c.64,000 communicants).We gripe about our bishops not being good enough “pastors”; then elect them on the basis of their “measurable,” generally administrative records. We give them canonical rights that no one else has, build them often neo-gothic castles (“cathedrals” in church lingo) grant them lifetime status in an ordination in which they have crown-like mitres put on their heads and are given scepter-like croziers before subsequently being seated in their own “THRONES” in which no one else is allowed to sit. Then we complain that they are “removed from the people” and autocratic! GO FIGURE! (My own son, about 15 at the time, told people quite seriously that he was going to my “coronation”!) I’ve GOT AN IDEA….HOW ABOUT AN EARLY CHURCH MODEL?….In addition to his/her parochial responsibilities, a senior priest in a metropolitan area might serve as bishop of the area, unless or until her/his area becomes so big that it requires assistant bishops (or a new diocese). NO! … that’ll never fly … too APOSTOLIC or “NEW TESTAMENT-ISH”! (Besides, the Presbyterians and Methodists will probably think they’ve won and want to join up with us, despite the fact that the Presbyterians hate the term “BISHOP” even more than we hate “DISTRICT SUPERINTENDANT”)FINALLY … WE MIGHT ACTUALLY TAKE CUIC SERIOUSLY before going any further! Rector Belleville, IL (The Rev.) Charles Chatham says: May 2, 2012 at 6:57 pm I read most of the comments with no specific suggestions. Let me suggest one. The scripture model might be helpful for my first sentence. A bishop of a diocese resides in a church in which he/she is the pastor. Then have suffragan bishops responsible for each deanery/region or smaller grouping who also are pastors of churches in that diocese. Make the office of bishop an honor with little remuneration difference from other pastors. After all, many of us priests chair committees/commissions outside our churches with no extra pay. I don’t know where to go from here as regards a treasurer, etc. If we want the deans of deaneries/regions to be in place of the suggested suffragan bishops, do as the Roman Catholics and have the deans do confirmations as appointed by the bishop. Some of this might be helpful. The change on a national scale will take a lot of thinking and discussion. I think we need to look at every angle. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 2, 2012 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC May 3, 2012 at 1:58 pm A highly provocative article which helps to lift us out of the boxes we frequently inhabit when trying to explain why the Church is in decline. I find it particularly inspiring that so many other denominations are coming to the same conclusions and are also working diligently to help the people of God to evolve once again into a more productive life form for this moment in history. Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA May 6, 2012 at 4:25 pm Much of what I’ve read here is worthy of immediate and serious consideration. Duplications can be ironed out down the line. Not sure it’s been mentioned, but I think much better use of and delegation of national and regional tasks for the provinces, with provinicial leaders gathering with the PB (and top FEW national executives) meeting according to newer, leaner, parish & diocese oriented, and simpler rules and time frames. The essential life of the church is the congregation and the first place for renewal and needed attention to be given! I hope the leadership now is serious and devoted to making the changes, or we’ll be decimated in another generation, if that long! God belss our couragrous and devoted action! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL John W Ward says: Russ Johnson says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Wilmaliu Tomlinson, St. James, MF, ORE says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 2, 2012 at 5:53 pm Yes, lots of words that someone other than I understands. My concern is with one small poor but lively congregation in a depressed area of a poor struggling diocese that is attempting to survive despite inadequate funds, and appears to be succeeding.Does all of the verbiage coming from the national church leadership provide help? I don’t know. Hopefully, GC in Indy this summer will give us something we can actually work with. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service] The 77th meeting of the Episcopal Church’s General Convention is being asked to sift and winnow a variety of answers to the question of what to do about the Episcopal Church’s structure that, as one group says, it “no longer needs, nor can it afford.”At least nine of the committees, commissions, agencies and boards (CCABs) of convention touch on the issue in their Blue Book reports. The comments and proposed solutions range from the over-arching to the extremely specific.Some, but not all, of those nine CCABs have supplemented their comments with resolutions (designated by the letter “A”) meant for convention to consider when it meets July 5-12 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis, Indiana, in the Diocese of Indianapolis. (Legislative committee hearings and some other convention activities begin July 4.)The CCABs are not the only groups weighing in about how the Episcopal Church should change. Resolutions may also be submitted to convention by three other groups: bishops (B resolutions), dioceses (C resolutions) and deputies (D resolutions), and at least 29 of the church’s 110 dioceses have already filed resolutions about the church’s future structure.Many of those diocesan resolutions are based on a model resolution suggested to the House of Bishops in September by Bishop Stacy Sauls, a member of the house who is also the church’s chief operating officer. (A video version of Sauls’ presentation about structural change, made as he presented it to Episcopal Church Center staff, is here. A PowerPoint  version, with Sauls’ notes at the end, is here.)The model resolution would have convention call for a special commission appointed by the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies to present, possibly to a special meeting of General Convention before the 78th General Convention in 2015, “a plan to the church for reforming its structures, governance, administration, and staff to facilitate this church’s faithful engagement in Christ’s mission….”Sauls told the church’s Executive Council at its April 18 – 20 meeting that he wants to talk with the council and the church “about putting everything on the table and rebuilding the church for a new time that has no precise historical precedent.” He added that he wants to talk to council “not about the panic of our declining numbers but about how we strengthen what is working best out there and make what is strong stronger so that the strong can serve the less-than-strong.”The Rev. Gay Jennings, a council member from the Diocese of Ohio, noted in her closing sermon at the same meeting the “surprisingly passionate conversations about structure, governance, roles, responsibilities, canonical and constitutional amendments, rules of order, CCABs, budgets, staff, and General Convention.”“As I talk to people around the church, people are clear that there is a need for something new, people are passionate, but there aren’t many concrete suggestions offered, and some are not sure about what the structure of the church actually consists of,” she said. “The good news is that people care about how we are structured.”“How we go about restructuring is as important as how we restructured,” Jennings continued. “Will we be true to our Baptismal Covenant? Will we be courageous and brave?”Other denominations also face questions of structural changeThe calls for structural change in the Episcopal Church are not unusual. They come in response to the challenges facing all mainline churches, including declining membership and thus declining finances, demographic shifts and cultural changes in the place and authority accorded to religious communities in society.Questions of structural reform dominated discussion during the April 16 – 20 meeting of the Anglican Church of Canada’s House of Bishops, according to the Anglican Journal. “We are talking about more effective use of our resources, both human and financial, to do the work that God is calling us to do,” said Archbishop Fred Hiltz in an interview with Anglican Journal following the meeting.The United Methodist Church’s quadrennial General Council, meeting April 24-May 4 in Tampa, Florida, is faced with complex restructuring proposals that would consolidate some church agencies and change how they are governed. General Administration Legislative Committee refused April 28 to recommend either of two officially proposed plans — Call to Action and Methodist Federation for Social Action.Proponents of those two plans can still bring their plans to the floor to be debated and voted on, according to the United Methodist News Service. And supporters of a so-called Plan B alternative could still make a motion to the plenary session to substitute their legislation for the others. Proponents of the various plans have been in discussions about possible compromises, according to UMNS.Meanwhile, a proposal that grew out of the Call to Action plan to have the president of the Council of Bishops serve full time for four years without the responsibilities of overseeing a geographic area failed to receive the needed two-thirds majority. Delegates also voted down a proposed four-year study on the question. The failure came a week after the Council of Bishops agreed to reduce its structure and meet as a full council only once a year.When the Presbyterian Church USA meets June 30 – July 7 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for its 220th General Assembly it will consider the report of its Special Committee on “The Nature of the Church in the 21st Century.” The committee was called for at the last General Assembly (in 2010) to “help to increase understanding of the church from a Reformed and Presbyterian perspective and assist current and new members in forming faithful plans for our common future.” The committee is bringing 10 recommendations to this summer’s General Assembly, ranging from ministry development and other vocational questions to new immigrant communities and multilingual communications.The 10th recommendation discusses how Presbyterian individuals and organizations live out their faith publicly. It calls in part for the church to “focus its ministry and resources on the society-at-large and to mobilize its agencies/entities, councils, congregations, and members/disciples to reach out holistically with the Gospel of Jesus Christ to participate in God’s just peace and sociopolitical transformation.”The assembly will also hear a series of eight recommendations from a committee meant to review its biennial assembly schedule and how those assemblies are conducted.In August 2011, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s Churchwide Assembly dealt with proposals about the role of the ELCA’s churchwide organization to accompany congregations and synods, build capacity for evangelical witness and service, strengthen interdependent relationships, promote God’s vision of a multicultural and multiethnic church, coordinate global mission and relief work, and lead in new ways theological reflection and deliberation on the identity and mission of the church.The proposals came out of the report of the ELCA’s Living into the Future task force charged with recommending options for the future of the ELCA. The assembly also voted to move from a biennial meeting schedule to a triennial cone, beginning in 2016.And the United Church of Christ, also meeting last summer, approved what it called Unified Governance revisions to its constitution and bylaws. The UCC’s 38 Conferences were asked to ratify the constitutional amendments before the next General Synod in 2013. They must be approved by two-thirds of the conference to go into effect. The changes will combine the five existing governance boards into a single, 52-member United Church of Christ Board.The General Assembly defeated a proposal to lengthen its biennial meeting cycle to three or four years.Proposals from the Blue BookAgainst that background, below is a summary of comments and resolutions from the nine Episcopal Church CCABs, in order of their appearance in the Blue Book:♦  The results of the House of Deputies Study Committee on Church Governance and Polity, appointed in September 2009 by House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson, will be available soon. The committee was charged with presenting the House of Deputies with “a study of the history, theology, political structure and practical realities of our Church’s governance and polity, and to explain why we believe it is essential to empower each order of ministry ‘to take their place in the governance of the Church.’” The members were also asked to discuss “what kind of theology is embodied in such a polity; what strengths flow from our system of government and what challenges this presents; and to make recommendations based on its findings to strengthen our self-understanding.”The committee decided to provide all deputies with a collection of essays addressing the topics. The publication will be available to others as well. The Rev. Tobias Haller BSG, chair of the committee, told ENS that the publication is due out soon. Church Publishing Inc. is producing both printed and electronic versions of the collection (not Forward Movement, as the committee said in its Blue Book report). [Editor’s note: as of June 6, 2012, “Shared Governance: The Polity of the Episcopal Church” is available for a charge here.]Report begins on page 57.♦ The extensive report from the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church notes that the Episcopal Church, “like all mainline Christian churches — is a denomination undergoing transition … But this transition is also reflected in the realization that the Church is no longer in a world dominated by a ‘corporate’ structure and mindset …”The report extensively reviews patterns of membership and giving, and concludes that “the Episcopal Church’s ‘growth spurt’ took place during the 1950s and 1960s, a time when the business corporation emerged as the dominant mode for all kinds of American institutions, including churches. Looking at the 2010 end of the chart, it is clear that this era has passed.” The members say they want to emphasize “the need for the church to find new and different ways to organize and function for ministry in a transformed environment,” and they note that the “key concepts” guiding their thinking included mission, structure, technology, and transparency.In a survey conducted among the deputies, the committee found, among other things, that for most lay deputies and alternates, the restructuring of the staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society during the triennium had no discernible effect on their lay ministries. The restructuring happened in the wake of the last General Convention’s approval of a budget that was $23 million smaller than the one for the previous triennium.The committee did not propose resolutions related to restructuring the church.Report begins on page 59.♦ The Standing Commission on Lifelong Christian Formation and Education says in its report that “education in the history, structure and governance of the Episcopal Church is necessary for leaders” and proposes Resolution A041 (Amend Canon I.17) to require that each congregation provide instruction in the history, structure and governance of the Episcopal Church, and state that anyone “accepting any office” in the church shall have completed that instruction, as well as instruction “in the duties and responsibilities of their office.”Report begins on page 151.♦ “How do we develop ways by which church structures will be transformed in such a way that they naturally enable, empower, equip and support the ministry of all baptized?” the Standing Commission on Ministry Development asks in its report. A subcommittee of the commission recommends that General Convention call on the “whole church to be responsive to the context of a changing world, taking into account the shifting demographics, biotechnical changes and how the ministry of all baptized can be a step towards a new direction.”Ministry Development did not propose any resolutions dealing with structural change.Report begins on page 475.♦ The Standing Commission on the Mission and Evangelism of the Episcopal Church bases its two main proposals for structural change on its conclusion that “the assumption of a Christian nation is no more. The assumption of a white, middle-to upper-middle class majority is no more.”“Our structures, policies, strategies and Book of Common Prayer are largely designed for contexts that either no longer exist, or simply no longer dominate,” the commission says — adding, however, that “there is no reason to scrap all that we’ve known, done and loved. There is an urgent need to translate it, creating spaces that serve as ‘mission laboratories’ where the ancient meets the future, where the traditions meet the margins.”The members call for creating such space for innovation by “agreement within a diocese to suspend certain conventional practices in a strategic location, followed by reflection on structures and canons.”“We can then revise those statutes, once it is clearer what structures would facilitate ministry in rapidly changing contexts,” they say.Thus they propose Resolution A073 (Establish Diocesan Mission Enterprise Zones) that would have the convention establish a $1 million Mission Enterprise Fund to give grants of up to $20,000 each to dioceses to form Mission Enterprise Zones, “defined as a geographic area, as a group of congregations or as an entire diocese committed to mission and evangelism that engages under-represented groups.”Until the next convention, the zones would be granted greater freedom as authorized by the bishop in consultation with diocesan leadership regarding the designation of “congregation” status, traditional formation for and use of ordained leadership and the use of authorized texts for principle worship gatherings.The fund would be administered by the Executive Council Standing Committee on Local Ministry and Mission.“Structures are important and necessary, but they must be flexible enough not to inhibit the proclamation of the gospel by faithful Episcopal communities, and they have to be re-evaluated as mission conditions on the ground shift,” the commission says in its resolution explanation. “By creating these stations for mission enterprise, and then studying them, we will know what structures to create to recognize and encourage the growth of new and redeveloped faith communities.”The standing commission would gather reports on the results of the efforts, reflect on the accounts and “use them to fulfill the request of the Executive Council to help the church ‘create a canonical process to incorporate new faith community models into our existing structures’” by the 78th General Convention.The commission’s second proposal calls for restructuring General Convention itself so that it “provides training and inspiration for mission and evangelism through intentional leadership training, sharing of ‘best practices,’ storytelling, networking and engaging in mission in the host city — being the hands and feet of Jesus Christ: a community in action.”Resolution A075 (Restructure General Convention and Church Governance) would set up a task force of the General Convention on missional structure and strategy charged with “presenting a plan to the church for reforming its structures, governance, administration, and staff to facilitate this church’s faithful engagement in Christ’s mission in a way that maximizes the resources available for that mission at all levels of this church.”The resolution includes in its call for “serious consideration” of “more mission-focused models of General Convention,” a suggestion for “simplifying the structure of General Convention governance” by moving to a unicameral legislature.The task forces would report to the church no later than February 1, 2015. The resolution asks for $100,000 for implementation.Report begins on page 497.♦ The Standing Commission on the Structure of the Church was charged by the Executive Council in February 2011 with coordinating the church’s various conversations on strategic planning and possible structural change. For two days in May 2011, the commission gathered representatives from the joint standing committees on Program, Budget and Finance and Planning and Arrangements; the Standing Commission on Constitution and Canons; the Budgetary Funding Task Force, the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church, and council’s Governance and Administration for Mission, Finances for Mission and Strategic Planning committees, as well as Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson, General Convention Secretary and Episcopal Church Executive Officer Gregory Straub and Treasurer Kurt Barnes.After the gathering, the commission, according to its Blue Book report, “reflected on what was heard, synthesized central themes and concerns,” asked the council for feedback in June 2011 and then developed a final version of its report on the gathering which includes 11 proposed resolutions.The commission said it wanted to present not “final answers to what a re-energized structure might look like,” but “to assure that the right questions are asked so that all members of the church can live out their baptismal ministries in a structure that honors effectiveness over efficiency and provides the stability necessary to support an atmosphere of flexibility and nimbleness for ministry and mission.”Resolution A090 (Endorse the Principle of Subsidiarity) calls for convention and Executive Council to “embrace” subsidiarity that works for “the appropriate balance between the unity of the whole and the roles and responsibility of its parts, all working toward and measured against a sense of the good of the whole,” and to measure all current and future operations by it.Resolution A091 (Reduce Diocesan Apportionments) would direct the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) to reduce the amount of money convention asks dioceses to contribute to the work of the churchwide operation “to allow more monies to remain at the diocesan, and thus parish and regional, levels to support greater encouragement of widespread, effective innovation.” No amount is suggested in the resolution.Resolution A092 (Length of the 78th General Convention) would have the 2015 meeting last not fewer than 10 days as a way to avoid “compression of time and competition for witnesses’ focus” that “curtails debate in the committees and also contributes to an atmosphere of impatience with debate on the floor and a desire to limit the speakers heard.”Resolution A093 (Fund for the Length of the 78th General Convention) would ask PB&F to adequately fund a 10-day convention and Resolution A094 (Establish Financial Assistance Fund for Deputies) would have PB&F set up a fund to ensure that at least two clergy and two lay deputies from each diocese can attend that meeting of convention. The resolution’s explanation notes that a similar fund exists for bishops from dioceses with limited resources to attend meetings of the House of Bishops.Resolution A095 (Frequency of Interim Meetings of the House of Bishops) would ask the bishops to limit their meetings to once a year. The bishops now meet twice during certain years of the triennium.Resolution A096 (Reduce Barriers to Participation in Church Leadership and Governance) calls on dioceses and congregations to find “creative ways to reduce barriers to participation in church leadership and governance,” adding that those barriers may include time away from home or employment, or the need to care for family members. Such efforts would help to “reflect the full diversity of the church,” the members say.Resolution A097 (Fund Initial Joint-CCAB Meeting Following the 78th General Convention) would set aside money in the 2012-2015 budget to be passed by this summer’s meeting of General Convention to allow for a meeting in the fall of 2015 for “shared orientation, training and development of work plans for the [2016-2019] triennium.” Similarly, Resolution A098 (Fund Initial Joint-CCAB Meeting Following the 77th General Convention) would have the 2012-2015 budget include money for such a meeting in early 2013 for CCABs’ work in the 2012-2015 triennium.Resolution A099 (Fund Web-Based Mid-Triennium CCAB Meeting) calls for $5,000 for a meeting of no more than two representatives of each CCAB, or for one or more such meetings of appropriate representatives of CCABs so that the groups with shared or overlapping assignments “may learn about and from each other’s work.”Resolution A100 (Coordinate Church Reform and Restructuring) calls for the structure commission to receive and review various governance reform and restructuring proposals from around the church, and develop a framework for diocesan and provincial conversations about their mission and how changes in the larger structures of the church could enhance their efforts. Structure would gather the results of those conversations into its report to the 78th convention.In a twelfth resolution (Resolution A101, Convene Consultation on Diocesan Effectiveness) the commission proposes convening a consultation on the “effectiveness of dioceses, with a focus on the potential for re-aligning dioceses to maximize their effective witness and ministry.”Report begins on page 533.♦ Much of the Executive Council‘s attention to structural issues came via the coordination efforts it delegated to the structure commission, and the council is proposing to continue that delegation in at least one area. Resolution A122 (Financial Oversight and Budgeting Process) would have Structure “review, and recommend revisions to Canons and the Joint Rules of Order regarding the financial oversight and budgeting processes of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society and The Episcopal Church.”The other major focus to structural issues came from the Executive Council Committee on Strategic Planning. The summary of the latter’s report is below.The report of the Executive Council and most of its related committees begins on page 565.♦ Noting that “since 1789 our church has regularly changed her form of organization,” members of the Budgetary Funding Task Force advocate in their report for changes in a structure they note dates to just after World War II.During that time, they say, “the church followed corporate America in adopting a structure requiring a corporate headquarters in a major city (the more major the city, the more important the organization), with a staff of experts to dispense their wisdom to all below them.” Dioceses and parishes “were lined up under the national structure just as divisions and departments were subservient divisions of the modern American corporation.”Now, the members say, the organizational and financial problems the church faces “come out of fundamental changes in the culture and profound changes in understanding by the people of the church of their role and place in the church.” Thus “the church no longer needs, nor can it afford, the structure of the last fifty years,” they say.The members of the Budgetary Funding Task Force, which was created in 2003 by General Convention Resolution B004, come from five provinces, the Standing Commission on Stewardship and Development, the Joint Standing Committee on Program Budget and Finance (PB&F), and the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church.Chief Operating Officer Sauls was a member of the task force during the triennium. He discussed with the task force what might be called forerunners to his eventual presentation on structural change and its model convention resolution. There are mentions of his presentation in the task force’s minutes from its June and October 2010 meetings posted here.In making the case for their proposal, task force members caution that “while our organizational forms are fully open for alteration, abridgement, enlargement and the like, our form of governance is not to be altered. In this 21st century we continue to treasure the checks and balances, the honoring of all orders of ministry in decision making, open communication and consultation among bishops, priests, deacons and the laity that date back to this church’s founding General Convention in 1789.”In that light, they propose what they call a “foundation for fundamental re-formation of our organizational structure,” adding that it is “not the only solution or the perfect solution.” The proposal is similar to one the group presented to the General Convention in 2009, via Resolution A183, for a nine-year budget cycle. That resolution did not come to the floor.Resolution A150 (Develop Nine-Year Vision and Budget Cycle) would have convention call for the 2015 gathering to be given a plan to implement such a cycle. The resolution envisions a budget cycle that coincides with the term of each presiding bishop, with the triennium prior to the election of a presiding bishop being a time for “developing a common vision … for the purpose of informing the [presiding bishop] nomination and election process.”That vision would result in “term goals” to be accomplished during that bishop’s term. The houses would meet jointly at the beginning of the General Convention during which a presiding bishop is to be elected to amend and ratify the term goals. A so-called “term budget” would then be built based on those goals.There would be an annual budget report to the leaders and members of the church, and the convention would receive a review of the budget and progress towards meeting the goals via a joint meeting of the two houses “to encourage accountability and so that the goals may be revised as needed.” Church Center staff would be configured to meet the goals, with some positions coinciding with the term of the presiding bishop and others being permanent.Report begins on page 717.♦ Executive Council’s Committee on Strategic Planning was created in January 2009 to assist the council and the churchwide staff as they implemented the priorities of General Convention. The committee’s work continued into the 2010-2012 triennium via the mandate in Resolution A061 passed by the last convention.In the committee’s Strategic Plan for the Executive Council and the General Convention, the members say that the 10-year planning horizon originally envisioned for the work “is no longer practical.” They say some progress is being made on long-term planning, adding that there is “limited coordination, reporting and accountability.”The committee suggests that the strategic plan should have a three-year rolling horizon and it calls for a coordinating body for all strategic planning.“Significant progress will require significant structural changes to the Episcopal Church as a whole,” the committee said, adding that this statement “does not reflect the opinion” of Executive Council’s Governance and Administration for Mission committee or the entire council.Thus the committee proposes in its Resolution A155 (Continuous Cycle of Strategic Planning & Oversight) that convention affirm the Strategic Plan “as a working document” and that it be used as a model for the church as a whole and not just the Executive Council of the Church Center.The resolution would have convention establish a Standing Commission on Strategic Planning “to support a three-year rolling strategic planning process” for the church and to which the CCABs would annually report on their own strategic plans. The resolution would also call for the planning activities of the CCABs and the General Convention “be aligned with The Episcopal Church’s strategic planning process.” Provinces, dioceses and congregations would be encouraged to use the Episcopal Church strategic planning process as a model. They also would be encouraged to provide plans and annual updates to the new standing commission.General Convention would direct the council and PB&F to follow the strategic plan for “future financial and budgetary planning.”Report begins on page 728.The A resolutions have not yet been posted to the convention legislation site. Resolutions are posted as Jefferts Schori and Anderson assign them to one of the convention’s legislative committees.Other resolutions pertaining to structural change may yet be proposed. The deadline for filing any type of resolution (A, B, C or D) is 5 p.m. EDT July 6, the second official day of convention. The structure-related resolutions posted thus far have all been assigned to the legislative committee on structure and any action on those resolutions will begin in the House of Deputies.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.In Spanish: http://bit.ly/Iz0yGK Comments (11) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Fr. Bob Crewdson says: Rector Smithfield, NC May 5, 2012 at 6:25 pm Except that the General Theological Seminary is NOT in any way (slightly or otherwise) subsidized by the General Convention.Ted Gerbracht, former Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the General Theological Seminary. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK May 2, 2012 at 9:18 pm Speaking of mission and the Gospel of Christ, the 2000 General Convention passed a last minute resolution called 20/20; in essence to focus on evangelism and double ASA by the year 2020. This was achievable if the hearts and will of the Executive Council’s leaders had matched the enthusiasm (and the legislative mandate) of the General Convention. 20/20 was completely ignored after passage, never funded, and it was evident that the heart and mind of some mysterious behind-the-scenes “shadow convention” would instead push the gay agenda and the gender neutral liturgies. Just who has the power to ignore a General Convention mandate? Who holds that much power that the will of the Church was flatly ignored and replaced with pressure group interests instead? Doubling ASA within 20 years would have required a refocus on the Gospel of Christ and TEC would look different today – and have more income as a natural result of obedience to the Great Commission (as hoped for by General Convention 2000). The Church doesn’t have attendance or financial problems; we have a heart disease. Tags Fr. Jay Pierce says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ted Gerbrach says: Rt. Rev. Douglas E. Theuner says: Rector Collierville, TN General Convention, Submit a Press Release Doug Desper says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

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‘Repent, fast, lament for your nation,’ urges Sri Lanka bishop

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls By ACNS staffPosted Jan 28, 2013 Rector Tampa, FL ‘Repent, fast, lament for your nation,’ urges Sri Lanka bishop Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishop of Colombo has called members of the Church of Ceylon to fast, pray and lament over the state of the nation of Sri Lanka after what he described as “the complete collapse of the rule of law” there.The Rt. Rev. Dhiloraj Canagasabey was writing after the government impeached Chief Justice Shirani Bandaranayake over allegations of financial and official misconduct. She denies the allegations and her removal was pronounced unlawful by the courts and condemned by the opposition.In a pastoral letter sent around the small island nation’s Anglican community, Canagasabey said he wrote “with a heavy heart” about the state of governance in Sri Lanka and added that the church should not stay silent.“Such silence will be dishonoring to our Lord and a betrayal of our identity as His people,” he wrote. “I wish to remind you that right from the day of Pentecost, the church has learned to say that ‘Jesus is Lord and not Caesar.’ Often this has led to suffering and persecution. The church must always be prepared for this eventuality.”The bishop said the church needs to repent for its times of silence and of complicity in injustice. He has therefore called for a Day of Lament on Feb. 3, a Time of Lament at the cathedral on Feb. 4 and for the church to use Lent as a time to reflect on “what it means to live as a faithful disciple-community of Jesus in the context of our nation today.”The Church of Ceylon is the Anglican Church in Sri Lanka. It is extra-provincial to the archbishop of Canterbury.Read the full letter below.Pastoral Letter 01/2013My Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,I write this pastoral letter to you as your Bishop as we approach the 65th anniversary of our national independence. It is with a heavy heart that I write it, the reason being that in the past few days we have seen the complete collapse of the rule of law in our nation. We no longer appear to be a constitutional democracy.The rule of law means that we as a nation are governed by a system of laws to which the lawmakers themselves are subject. This is a way of ensuring that power is not concentrated in the hands of one person (or group of persons) and exercised arbitrarily. The breakdown of such accountability is a process that has been building up for the past several years. It has now climaxed in the recent events that have seen both the Executive and the Legislature disregarding the provisions of the very Constitution which they swore to uphold and defend, giving the appearance of a country ruled on the principle that “Might is Right”The numerous warnings that the Church, other religious organizations and civil society bodies repeatedly issued have been ignored. There is currently a climate of fear and helplessness, where people remain silent rather than speak out against rampant injustice, intimidation, violence and falsehoods.We as a Christian Church cannot remain silent in this situation. Such silence will be dishonouring to our Lord and a betrayal of our identity as His people. I wish to remind you that right from the day of Pentecost, the Church has learnt to say that ‘Jesus is Lord and not Caesar’. Often this has led to suffering and persecution. The Church must always be prepared for this eventuality.There are many examples in the Bible and Christian history of persons who have refused to follow orders when they have contradicted God’s moral law. Even in the Old Testament, Kings were expected to rule under a law which they themselves did not make and to which they were accountable (Deuteronomy 18; Psalms 72, etc.). Where rulers violated the law, God challenged them through prophetic men and women chosen and sent by him. The Church is called to be such a prophetic presence and voice in our local communities, our places of work, our schools and in the wider society.This is a time for us as a Church to take an honest look at ourselves, where we have shamelessly compromised our loyalty to God. We need to repent of ways in which we, as individuals as well as collectively, have;been silent when we should have spokenallowed ourselves (thoughtlessly or out of fear) to be used by those in authority to speak lies or commit wrong and unjust actsconsciously received benefits for ourselves through acts of injustice committed against othersI as your Bishop, call the Church to a period of lament together for the terrible state of our nation today, and repentance for our failing as a Church to “love mercy, to seek justice and to walk humbly with the Lord” (Micah 6:8).I therefore propose that(a)  Sunday 3rd February 2013 be observed in all parishes within our Diocese as a Day of Lament. All services should have an extended time of silence, prayer and intercessions, to grieve over the state of our country today. Please encourage all parishioners to wear white and to fast wherever possible.(b)  We as a diocese will congregate on 4th February 2013 at 9am, dressed in white, or a service to continue our Time of Lament. Those who are unable to be present at the Cathedral for this service are encouraged to gather in their own churches at this time.(c)  I further propose that all parishes in our Diocese have a series of Bible studies, reflections and discussions during Lent, which is traditionally a period of self-examination and penitence, to reflect on what it means to live as a faithful disciple-community of Jesus in the context of our nation today.I thank God for the calling he has given us to be faithful to Him. When others may be controlled by fear and helplessness, we must remember that our Lord who was crucified and suffered death was raised to new life offering hope to all.In the words of St. Paul, “Therefore my brethren stand firm and immovable, and work for the Lord always; work without limit since you know that in the Lord, your labour cannot be in vain”(1 Corinthians 15:58)With Prayers and Christian Greetings!The Rt. Revd Dhiloraj CanagasabeyBishop of Colombo Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

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Canada: Faith, worship and ministry presents three new reports

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canada: Faith, worship and ministry presents three new reports Anglican Communion, Canada Joint Assembly, Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Leigh Anne WilliamsPosted Jul 8, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Faith, worship and ministry committee member Louise Peters pours oil as she discusses work on new baptismal liturgies. Photo: Art Babych[Anglican Journal] The faith, worship and ministry committee gave General Synod members an overview of its work in the past triennium, and three resolutions relating to its work were passed.“The role of faith, worship and ministry is to help Canadian Anglicans to live out our faith thoughtfully, prayerfully and with commitment,” said committee chair Canon Andrew Asbil, who compared its work to connective tissue in the body.Bruce Myers, the church’s co-ordinator for ecumenical relations, highlighted a joint Christian education project with the Roman Catholic Church in Canada and dialogue with the United Church of Canada on new models of unity to which the two churches might be called.Bishop Linda Nicholls said that in this triennium the ethics sub-group of the committee has worked toward developing policies on abuse, sexual violence and screening for ministry.Canon Eric Beresford spoke about the strides that have been made in building relationships and trust between African and North American bishops in a series of dialogues intended to help heal divisions in the Anglican Communion.A liturgical task force has been working to revise common texts and to gather new liturgies and resources . For example, said Louise Peters, the task force has been identifying liturgical needs around baptism, such as the need for an appropriate rite for an interfaith family or when a parent is not a Christian.General Synod members approved three motions from the FWM committee:Resolution A140, which asked General Synod to receive the Final Report of the Primate’s Commission on Theological Education and Formation for Presbyteral Ministry and adopt Competencies for Theological Education for Ordination to the Priesthood in the Anglican Church of Canada.Resolution A141, which asked General Synod to receive the Jerusalem Report on diakonia (the ministry of service) of the Anglican-Lutheran International Commission and refer it to the Joint Anglican-Lutheran Commission to co-ordinate study and response.  (The report has also been presented to churches in the Anglican Communion and Lutheran World Federation.)Resolution A142, which asked General Synod to receive The Church: Toward a Common Vision (produced by the Faith  and Order Commission, World Council of Churches) and commend it for study to the Anglican Church of Canada. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

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Aún hay tiempo para solicitar las subvenciones del fondo Constable…

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Aún hay tiempo para solicitar las subvenciones del fondo Constable de la Iglesia Episcopal La fecha límite es el 15 de noviembre Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [6 de noviembre de 2013] Aún hay tiempo para solicitar las subvenciones de fondo Constable para el ciclo de 2013-2014. La fecha límite es el 15 de  noviembre.El fondo Constable proporciona subvenciones para financiar iniciativas de la misión que no estaban previstos en el presupuesto de la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal /Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS).Anne Watkins, miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo de la diócesis de Connecticut y presidenta del Comité de Revisión de Subvenciones de Fondos Constable, destacó que las recientes donaciones Constable son desde $ 5,000 a $ 200,000Las solicitudes pueden ser presentadas por: (1) una oficina programática de la DFMS, (2) uno de los CCAB de la Convención General, (comité comisión agencia o junta) o (3) una de las provincias de la Iglesia Episcopal.Las pautas específicas, sugerencias, formulario de solicitud y el calendario están disponibles aquí.Las subvenciones serán revisadas en enero y las recomendaciones serán enviadas al Consejo Ejecutivo para que tomen una medida en su reunión de febrero de 2014. Los beneficiarios serán notificados cuando esta reunión concluya.Para obtener más información comuníquese con Watkins en [email protected], Sam McDonald, Director Adjunto de Operaciones y Director de la Misión,[email protected] con el nombre de la Señorita ConstableLas subvenciones Constable tiene ese nombre porque fue nombrado por la señorita Mary Louise Constable, que fue una filántropa visionaria. Watkins señaló: “El ejemplo de ella es un testimonio fiel y de generosidad en respuesta al obvio y  maduro conocimiento profundo de sí misma tanto como un discípulo de Jesucristo y como mayordoma de las bendiciones otorgadas a ella por Dios”.En 1935, en medio de la catástrofe económica conocida como la Gran Depresión, la señorita Constable hizo un regalo monetario a la Iglesia Episcopal para establecer el Fondo Constable. Su deseo e intención de añadir periódicamente al fondo durante su vida fue realizado y culminado con un último regalo muy generoso a la hora de su muerte en 1951.Watkins explica además: “Las estipulaciones para el uso del fondo eran además visionario y generoso, reconociendo y confiando en los que vinieron después de ella para cumplir con sus deseos, mientras que se permitía la flexibilidad para realizar la misión de Dios a través de la Iglesia de Dios para avanzar a nuevas eras”.El lenguaje del testamento de la señorita Constable afirma que existe el fondo “en perpetuidad… para aplicar el ingreso neto para los fines de la Sociedad, de preferencia por el trabajo en la educación religiosa no previsto en el presupuesto de la Sociedad”.“Es el deseo de la Comisión Ejecutiva del Comité de Revisión de la Subvención de Fondos Constable que el ejemplo de mayordomía, generosidad, flexibilidad y creatividad de la señorita Constable, sean valores que continúen siendo honrados”, concluyó Watkins. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Nov 6, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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American priest elected bishop for New Westminster diocese

first_img December 2, 2013 at 5:57 pm New Westminster and the ACC will be richer for the presence and ministry of Melissa Skelton. She is awesome and brings out the very best in people. By Marites N. SisonPosted Dec 2, 2013 Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI People Bishop-elect Melissa M. Skelton will be consecrated bishop of the Diocese of New Westminster on March 1, 2014. Photo: Dot Cellini[Anglican Journal] An American priest who describes herself as a “Canadian enthusiast” has been elected the first woman bishop in the Anglican Diocese of New Westminster and the first woman diocesan bishop in the ecclesiastical Province of British Columbia and the Yukon.The Rev. Canon Melissa M. Skelton, canon for congregational development and leadership and rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Seattle, in the Diocese of Olympia, was elected by a special synod on Nov. 30, in Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver. She succeeds Bishop Michael Ingham, who retired last August.“Stunned,” “humbled” and “exhilarated” were her immediate reactions when she was elected on the third ballot after receiving a substantial majority of votes from the houses of clergy and lay, Bishop-elect Skelton told the Anglican Journal in a telephone interview.Bishop-elect Skelton is no stranger to the Vancouver-based diocese, having conducted comprehensive trainings in congregational development and leadership for its clergy and laity since 2011.It was a relationship that thrived and continued over the years — in 2012, she designed and facilitated New Westminster’s synod, a pivotal time for the diocese that had undergone a traumatic division over same-sex blessings that led all the way to the courts.“I experienced both an interest in and a willingness to engage in a listening process that, from my perspective, was a first step towards the restoration of a sense of unity in New Westminster,” she said in her nomination statement. “This willingness spoke to me, in that these very same listening processes would be a cornerstone of my approach in the creation of unity that is part of the role of bishop.”She has been nominated in two other episcopal elections before, one of which she withdrew from, saying she was not convinced it was the right one for her. Early this year, she came in second in the Diocese of New Jersey elections. That election “really helped me understand that they were not ready for me, put it that way. It was also good to discover that it wasn’t the right diocese for me,” she said.With the Diocese of New Westminster, however, there was a sense of peace. What feels right about it? “So many things,” she says, in her deep, measured voice. “My experience in the diocesan school for leadership and the kind of chemistry with the people and participants – that was very telling to me,” she said. Another big factor was her connection to Bishop Ingham. She first met him in 1994, when he was a newly minted bishop and she was running the training for new bishops at The General Theological Seminary (GTS), an Episcopal Church seminary based in New York City.And then there’s the matter of geography. Skelton has found an affinity with the west that has been “profound, very freeing and very compelling.” Nine years ago she moved from a small coastal parish in Maine to the diocese of Olympia, also known as the Episcopal Church in Western Washington. Initially she was “perplexed” by the transition. The west had “a different character, a different style of spirituality,” and the sun and the water appeared on a different side.But when she was nominated in the two U.S. episcopal elections, both of them in the northeast, Skelton said she realized that as much as she loved living in the east, it no longer felt like home.New Westminster has a “common spirit” with the dioceses of Olympia, Oregon and Spokane, and it “really feels like a wonderful match for who I am now,” she said. When she became a nominee to its election and responded to questions sent by the search and nominations committee, Skelton said, “The more I answered, the more I felt connected.”Coming into a highly visible diocese in Canada will not be a daunting prospect for Skelton, who was vice-president for administration at the General Theological Seminary when it was going through “a difficult time around slightly different issues.” In late 1993, the GTS had to reconsider its housing policy after a complaint was filed with the NY City Commission on Human Rights alleging discrimination on the basis of marital status and sexual orientation.“I learned what it was like to simply do the work you’re given to do in many ways. For me, it feels like being faithful in highly visible situations, keeping focused on the call of God,” she said.Congregational development and relationship building will be one of her key priorities as new bishop, said Skelton. She is eager to start building relationships “with this new group of people who have been so very enthusiastic and kind to elect me — a woman, a Canadian enthusiast and American-born person who deeply cares about their parishes,” she said.She is also most excited about the cultural diversity of Vancouver. “It’s an amazing place,” she said, adding she has a deep desire to find out how the church engages the diversity of these cultures.Born in Columbus, Georgia, to a military family of four children, Skelton had lived mostly in southeastern America and in Germany.Skelton became an Episcopalian in her twenties “from no real church background,” she said in her nomination statement.After she received a Master of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary, she became a priest in 1993, while she worked as a brand manager at Procter & Gamble.She later moved to GTS where, aside from overseeing the seminary’s operations, she taught courses in Christian Education and oversaw the College for Bishops.Skelton, who also has a master of English and a master of business administration, later left GTS to become vice-president of consumer and brand development, communications and advertising of Tom’s of Maine, which sells “natural toothpaste, deodorant, soap and more.”After leaving Tom’s, she became rector of Trinity Church in Castine, Maine, and started her own consulting business, which focused on “in-depth consumer work” and organizational and congregational development. In 2005, she became rector of St. Paul’s, in the Diocese of Olympia.According to the Diocese of Olympia website, she has an adult son, Evan, who lives with his wife, Emily, and their two sons, Austin and Evan, in Washington, D.C. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 December 2, 2013 at 6:24 pm Hi. I did not take this photo, nor have I ever taken credit for this photo of Melissa. It was taken byDot Cellini the Photographer for the Diocese of New Jersey and she should be credited. American priest elected bishop for New Westminster diocese The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Joe Webb says: Rev. Jessica Nakawombe says: Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab December 2, 2013 at 8:05 pm Exactly. The church of Christ is everywhere. It is us His followers who confine it. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Elections, Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 April 30, 2014 at 1:00 pm Melissa Skelton is a gem. She is deeply spiritual and eminently practical, a combination we desperately need in the Church. Blessings and peace in her new assignment. Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img John Andrews says: Submit an Event Listing Rev. Jessica Nakawombe says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ December 3, 2013 at 9:32 am FYI: the Anglican Journal credited Randy but, since I live in the Diocese of New Jersey, I am happy to set the record straight! Thanks for pointing us to the correct photog, Randy. Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curt Zimmerman says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL December 2, 2013 at 8:21 pm I am glad that she has been in the wider Church where there are no confines. And for female ordained ministers, we have had to chart our courses that are very different form the traditional course of being confined to a church building and a confined parish or geographical area. I am glad that the Canadian Church has opened the door to female bishops and Rev. Melissa Skelton being the pioneer. My hope and prayer is that it becomes common as they open up for more. Jesus had no geographical confines in His time. He went wherever he could reach. Likewise, Jesus had no physical building to preach and teach in. He went where He was needed most. In homes, in the country, in the city, at the seaside, in markets, at gatherings, you name it. Christ’s followers have institutionalised the Church of Christ, politicised it and monopolised it. No wonder, many have left, are leaving and are wary of joining the institutional churches!!! We need a new breath of air, ideas, methods, and a shaking of the status quo traditions that are not godly.Jesus said in Matthew 28,“Go into all the world and tell the Good News.” Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA December 2, 2013 at 5:35 pm One is ordained to where the church takes you, whether inside or outside the boundaries one expects. Thanks be to God Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Randy Murray says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (7) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

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Spanish-language ministry coordinator appointed in Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Spanish-language ministry coordinator appointed in Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service [Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina] Bishop Robert Skirving is pleased to announce the appointment of the Rev. Frederick Clarkson as Spanish-language ministry coordinator in the Diocese of East Carolina. The Rev. Clarkson will begin in the position July 15.Clarkson will be coming back to North Carolina after having spent 4 1/2 years with the Diocese of Texas, serving as vicar to St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church of Houston, where he started the Spanish-language service.The Spanish-language ministry coordinator is a full-time staff position for an Episcopal priest with work principally focused on the support, interconnection and leadership development of existing and emerging Spanish-language congregations and ministries of the Diocese of East Carolina. This new position in the diocese has been created, in part, through the generous funding of the Isabel James Lehto Foundation.Prior to Houston, Clarkson served in the Diocese of North Carolina as vicar to St. Matthew’s of Salisbury and The Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Cooleemee, near Winston-Salem. Clarkson has served on the Hispanic Ministry Board of both Texas and North Carolina, Black Ministry Commission, Board of St. James Seniors, Chaplain to the Houston Chapter of Integrity and the internet radio station CBE (Church Broadcast Entity).His goal in Eastern North Carolina will be to organize Hispanic ministry and reinvigorate Episcopal Latino communities with economic development programs. Clarkson knows that there must be an economic component to the equation to truly help minister and establish a ministry of sustainability and vibrancy. The long-term goal will be to develop full participation of Hispanic leadership within The Episcopal Church throughout eastern North Carolina.The Rev. Clarkson will spend his time divided between Diocesan House in Kinston, St. Peter’s in Washington (where he will reside) and other Spanish ministries within the diocese.Clarkson was born in Bogota, Colombia, to parents who had met while at American University in Washington, D.C. His father worked in Colombian banking and government positions, which led to the family traveling during the Colombian conflicts of the 1980s. Growing up, Clarkson spent time living in Maryland, New York, and finally living with his grandparents in Santa Barbara, California, for his high school years. After high school, he attended St. Andrews University in Scotland followed by a career in banking.The events of Sept. 11, 2001, sounded a call for him to serve in ministry and change his career course. Clarkson enrolled in Virginia Theological Seminary, graduated and took his first post with the Diocese of North Carolina, where he spent 4 1/2 years, before heading to the Diocese of Texas. Frederick loves staying active, reading, swimming and spending time with his two dogs, and he is always happy to see a good play.The Diocese of East Carolina is excited to welcome The Rev. Clarkson’s experienced world view and approach to ministry. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Posted Jun 20, 2017 Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release People Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

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Iglesia episcopal de Manhattan y su comunidad protegen a una…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Por Amy SowderPosted Aug 24, 2017 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Advocacy Peace & Justice, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Immigration, En una conferencia de prensa el 17 de agosto, en la iglesia episcopal Santa Cruz en Nueva York, la madre guatemalteca Amanda Morales Guerra, inmigrante indocumentada, aparece de pie junto a sus tres hijos, Dulce, Daniela y David. Ella anunció su determinación de luchar contra la deportación con la ayuda del Rdo. Luis Barrios (que está hablando), de políticos locales y de miembros de la comunidad. Foto de Radhames Morales/iglesia[Episcopal News Service] Amanda Morales Guerra podría ser arrancada de las vidas de sus hijos y devuelta al violento país del que huyó hace 14 años. El auténtico temor llevó a Morales, guatemalteca de 33 años en riesgo de deportación por entrar y vivir ilegalmente en Estados Unidos, a buscar santuario en la iglesia episcopal Santa Cruz [Holyrood Episcopal Church]  en el barrio de Washington Heights en el norte de Manhattan. Sus tres hijos nacieron en Estados Unidos y son, por consiguiente, ciudadanos estadounidenses.Desde que la familia Morales llegó a la iglesia, feligreses, vecinos de varias denominaciones religiosas y políticos se han unido a ella en solidaridad, atendiendo a las necesidades físicas, emocionales y espirituales de su familia.El 21 de agosto, sus defensores subieron también las gradas del edificio federal Jacob Javits, en el centro de Manhattan, para presentarle al tribunal de inmigración dos peticiones: una solicitud de que suspenda la expulsión y que reactive una solicitud de asilo que ella había presentado anteriormente, dijo el Rdo. Luis Barrios, sacerdote de la iglesia [de la] Santa Cruz. En una pequeña victoria para la familia Morales, el tribunal aceptó revisar su apelación y anunciar un dictamen después de 90 días, dijo Barrios.Una vigilia de oración interconfesional se ha programado para las 7 P.M. del 28 de agosto en el exterior de la iglesia Santa Cruz. “No creo que Dios nos creara para sufrir, de manera que debemos corregir este error”, dijo Barrios, que también es psicólogo forense y profesor de estudios latinos en la Universidad de la Ciudad de Nueva York (CUNY). “Voy a orar para que Dios me ayude a corregir esta injusticia de la sociedad”.Morales huyó de  Guatemala en 2004 porque la MS-13 —una banda internacional conocida por practicar secuestros, así como [incurrir en] tráfico de drogas, armas y personas— le hizo violentas amenazas a ella y a su familia. Estados Unidos concede asilo a personas que huyen de la persecución por razones de raza, religión, nacionalidad, pertenencia a un grupo social o por sus opiniones políticas en sus países de origen, según el Servicio de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de EE.UU.“La MS-13: esto es el crimen organizado, luego ¿cómo pueden devolver a esta mujer para allí? Y como mujer, es un problema doble; porque existe el problema de ser violada”, dijo Barrios. “Es una situación muy traumática para esta joven mujer y sus hijos. Veo su ansiedad y se me turba el sueño. Los niños están empezando a mostrar esta ansiedad de que su madre desaparezca”.Amanda Morales Guerra, natural de Guatemala y madre de tres hijos que son ciudadanos de EE.UU., buscó santuario, para eludir la deportación, en la iglesia episcopal Santa Cruz en el norte de Manhattan donde el Rdo. Luis Barrios es el sacerdote. Foto de Radhames Morales/iglesia .Las autoridades tuvieron conocimiento de su condición de indocumentada en 2014 —cuando ella no pudo mostrar una licencia de conducción luego de un accidente de tránsito— y alertaron a los agentes de inmigración. Desde entonces, Morales, que trabajaba en una fábrica que hace cuerdas para violoncelos, se ha presentado regularmente en una oficina de inmigración a citas concertadas, explicó Barrios. Ella paga impuestos y no tiene antecedentes penales, de manera que la deportación era de escasa prioridad hasta que el gobierno de Donald Trump comenzó a exigir una aplicación más estricta.La Agencia Federal de Inmigración y Aduana (ICE por su sigla en inglés) llevó a cabo cerca de un 40 por ciento más de arrestos con fines de expulsión en los primeros 100 días del gobierno de Trump que en el mismo período del año pasado, según la ICE. Eso significa que los agentes de deportación arrestaron administrativamente a 41.318 individuos por cargos de inmigración civil, en comparación con 30.028 personas arrestadas en el mismo tiempo en 2016. Los arrestos administrativos los practica un agente del gobierno, en este caso un agente de la ICE, sin necesidad de una orden que haya sido revisada y autorizada por un juez. Se trata de una orden de expulsión no penal.“A los agentes y funcionarios de la ICE les han dado claras instrucciones de concentrarse en amenazas al orden público y a la seguridad nacional, lo cual ha dado lugar a un aumento sustancial en los arrestos de extranjeros delincuentes convictos. Sin embargo, cuando encontramos a otras personas que se encuentran en el país ilegalmente, cumplimos con nuestro deber jurado y aplicamos la ley”, dijo Thomas Homan, director interino de la ICE en  un artículo sobre los primeros 100 días en la página web de la ICE.Aun así, las iglesias, las escuelas y los hospitales hace tiempo que se consideran “áreas sensibles” en que las autoridades usualmente no entran.Las iglesias de la Diócesis de Nueva York están en libertad de tomar sus propias decisiones respecto a lo que significa el santuario y la manera en que lo pueden proporcionar, dijo el obispo Andrew ML Dietsche, en una declaración al día siguiente de que Morales hiciera pública [su decisión]. Él alentó a las parroquias a proteger a sus miembros y a brindarles ayuda legal y pastoral a las personas indocumentadas, si bien entendiendo los riesgos para la parroquia y para la familia [a quien se le ofrecía] santuario.“No obstante, en el cambiante panorama en que nos encontramos respecto a inmigración y a las deportaciones, creo que es una opción bien ponderada marcada por la integridad y la fe. El clero y el pueblo de la parroquia Santa Cruz tienen todo mi apoyo, el apoyo de la diócesis y esta familia en peligro cuenta con mis oraciones”, dijo Dietsche.La obispa Mary Glasspool, colega de Dietsche, compiló una lista de recursos para que las iglesias los usen cuando se encuentren con problemas de santuario.Después de que a Morales le dijeran que comprara un boleto de ida a Guatemala y que se presentara en su próxima cita de inmigración, ella dejó su trabajo y casi todas sus pertenencias en su casa de Massapequa, un caserío próximo a Amityville en Long Island. El Rdo. Juan Carlos Ruiz, cofundador de la Nueva Coalición Santuario de la Ciudad de Nueva York, ayudó a Morales a encontrar la iglesia . Creada en 2007, la coalición es una red interconfesional de congregaciones, organizaciones y personas que ayudan a familias y comunidades a resistir la detención y la deportación a fin de permanecer juntas. Barrios ha sido miembro de la coalición durante seis años.Amanda Morales Guerra, que se ve aquí orando en la iglesia episcopal , huyó de amenazas de violencia en Guatemala y ha estado viviendo en Estados Unidos sin autorización y se enfrenta a una deportación. Foto de Radhames Morales/iglesia .Mientras Morales ha estado encerrada dentro de los muros góticos de la iglesia, feligreses y personas de todas partes han ayudado a la familia, entre ellas miembros de otras iglesias, estudiantes universitarios, maestros de primaria, personal sanitario, estudiantes de seminario, miembros de una sinagoga e incluso personas que regularmente acuden al comedor de beneficencia .“Esta mujer octogenaria con un andador asiste al comedor de beneficencia que tenemos aquí, y ella vino y le dio a Amanda $5. Uno comparte lo que tiene. Amanda estuvo llorando mucho rato después de eso”, dijo Barrios.Miembros de la iglesia colegiata de Fort Washington en Washington Heights,  que es parte de la Iglesia Reformada de América, donó sacos de dormir para la familia Morales.“Reconocemos que abrir las puertas para ayudar a una familia es tarea de una comunidad”, dijo la Rda. Damaris Whittaker, ministra principal de Fort Washington. “Predicamos amar al prójimo y acoger al extranjero, y esta es nuestra oportunidad de vivir el evangelio. Todos tenemos que dar un paso al frente para cerciorarnos de que los ayudamos”.En tanto [muchas] iglesias a través de Estados Unidos brindan santuario a las personas discretamente, Morales decidió hacerlo público, no sólo para presionar al gobierno respecto a su causa, sino también para ponerle un rostro a la difícil situación de muchos inmigrantes como ella, que viven con el terror de que sus familias resulten divididas, dijo Barrios.El concepto de santuario trasciende los problemas de inmigración, añadió él.“Se trata de crear un espacio seguro para grupos que están marginados u oprimidos, tales como las personas de color y los grupos LGBT. Tenemos que responder”, afirmó.– Amy Sowder es corresponsal especial de Episcopal News Service, así como escritora y redactora radicada en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Iglesia episcopal de Manhattan y su comunidad protegen a una madre guatemalteca y luchan por sus derechos A Amanda Morales y sus hijos, que se enfrentan a la separación y la deportación, les han concedido una revisión legal Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Refugees Migration & Resettlement Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

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