Bulldog 100

first_imgSeven alumni from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences were honored as Bulldog 100: Fastest Growing Bulldog Businesses on Jan. 22 at the Marriott Marquis in Atlanta.The Bulldog 100 focuses on an individual business’s average three-year growth rate and then ranks all of the businesses – regardless of size – based on their growth rate.Branch Carter of Grovetown, who graduated from UGA with a degree in agricultural communications, credits both his education and the friends he made while in college with some of his business’s success.“It all goes back to people,” said the owner of Branch Carter Photography. “Knowing the UGA College of Agriculture, even though it’s large, it still has a smaller feel to it. It’s a place where you feel like you know the people and feel like you know them as friends.”“It’s thrilling to see our CAES alums recognized in this way,” said Juli Fields, CAES director of alumni relations. “We know the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences successfully prepares its graduates for lucrative careers, and the Bulldog 100 program allows us to showcase those alums who have hit a homerun in the business world. … These alumni-owned businesses have a tremendous impact on the economy of this state.”Winners who graduated from CAES and their rankings were:• Hardy Edwards (1985, BSA in agricultural economics and 1994, MS in food science), owner of Vitamin Derivatives Inc. in Winterville, second place• Branch Carter (1994, BA in agricultural communications), owner of Branch Carter Photography in Grovetown, at 34• Thomas Zeke Harvey (2001, BSA in landscape grounds management), owner of Chappell Mill Trees in Milner, at 42• Harold Still (1966, BSAE in agricultural engineering), owner of Southern AGCOM Inc. in Blakely, at 45• Mark Tribby (1984, BSA in biological sciences and 1988, doctor of veterinary medicine), of Saint Frances Animal Hospital in Augusta, at 60• Jim Moore (1978, BSA in agricultural economics and 1981, juris doctorate) of Moore, Clarke, Duvall & Rodgers PC in Albany, at 62• Charles Hall (1972, BSA in horticulture and 1974, MS in horticulture), owner of Association Services Group in LaGrange, at 80“We hope other CAES alums will take the time to nominate their business for the 2012 class,” Fields said. “Being a part of that group of successful businesses can only be a positive.”The Bulldog 100 is in its second year. Winning businesses have all been in operation at least five years, are owned or operated by a UGA alumnus and have a yearly revenue of more than $100,000 for 2007.Bob Pinckney (’82) and Justin Niefer (’05) of protective sports wear manufacturer Evoshield in Bogart came in first place. Pinckney is a former Georgia 4-H’er. Evoshield had a growth rate of 130.48 percent from 2007-2009.Nominations for the 2012 class of Bulldog 100 businesses opened Jan. 24. For more information visit www.uga.edu/alumni/bulldog100.last_img read more

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Pollinator Plan

first_imgMany food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.“The issue is that we have broad-scale problems with our pollinators — both in numbers and in diversity,” said Kris Braman, an entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and a member of the team that created the “Protecting Georgia’s Pollinators” plan. Pollination involves transferring pollen from the male parts of a flower to the female parts of the same, or a different, flower. This simple act of nature is essential to the production of many seed crops. Insect pollinators contribute more than $24 billion to the U.S., according to a fact sheet released by the White House in June 2014. A 2014 economic impact study by UGA lists the annual value of pollination in Georgia at more than $360 million.“Bees outperform most other pollinators, but bees are just 17.57 percent of the total pollinator population. Ants, wasps, butterflies and other insects, like native bees, play an essential role, too,” Braman said. “They are very important to modern agriculture, and the service they provide to the ecosystem is free.”Since 2006, U.S. beekeepers have lost about 30 percent of their colonies each winter. Honeybees are also dying as a result of pests, like varroa mites and hive beetles, from habitat and forage degradation and from broad applications of certain insecticides that kill other essential, pollinating insects. A large bee kill in Oregon had a ripple effect across the nation, Braman said. “A landscape company improperly treated trees at a shopping center and 50,000 bees died as a result. The pesticide that was used has a very low (toxic affect on humans and animals), so it’s widely used. New pesticides are being sought that have systemic effects but do not hurt bees,” said Braman, who also directs the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is encouraging states to create specific plans to improve pollinator health. In addition to Braman, the Georgia state plan committee includes other experts from UGA and the Georgia Department of Agriculture. The committee’s primary goal is to provide a method for beekeepers, growers, pesticide applicators and landowners to better cooperate and communicate to protect pollinators.“We hoped to put a plan in place to garner wide-scale support from our stakeholders and communities,” she said. “Protecting our state pollinators is everybody’s responsibility.”Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black said the issue of honeybee health, in particular, is “complex” and includes factors like new viral diseases, mites, nutrition and exposure to nonlethal doses of insecticides. “Communication between farmers and beekeepers is essential if we are going to promote a healthy pollinator population. Both agricultural and nonagricultural interests will greatly benefit from this common sense plan and greater awareness of pollinator protection issues,” Black said. “However, no plan created by government or academia will ever surpass the vital role of individual responsibility.”Georgia’s plan includes guidelines — not rules — to follow to protect pollinating insects.“The plan is not an anti-pesticide plan and it’s not a regulation. This is a voluntary stewardship plan. It’s a list of best practices to conserve and better manage pollinator habitats and minimize pesticide exposure,” said Braman.The guidelines also include ways that beekeepers can keep their bees healthy and be better neighbors. These tips include making varroa mite control a top priority, placing beehives away from human traffic, planting adequate floral resources, replacing failing queens and providing bees with an adequate water supply. On the flip side, the plan also includes guidelines for home gardeners and commercial landscapers. These tips include leaving portions of property undisturbed for soil-nesting bees, mowing grass to remove flowering weeds before applying pesticides and planting pollinator-attracting plants like crape myrtle, sages, clovers and sunflowers.“There are yellow and black-striped ‘Bee Aware’ flags available to denote where bees are. Consumers can also look for the new pollinator protection advisory, a symbol of a bee inside a diamond, on pesticides that can harm honeybees and other insect pollinators,” Braman said.Educating the public on the importance of pollinating pests is essential to protecting them, she said.“Not everyone has that warm, fuzzy feeling about insects, especially bees. As educators, we communicate the benefits so people can learn to appreciate why they are important,” Braman said. “One plant at a time, one landscape at a time, we can make a difference.”The official plan is available online at t.uga.edu/28O. For more information on honeybee research at UGA, go to ent.uga.edu/bees.last_img read more

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Central America and the Caribbean prepare to stop Ebola

first_imgCentral American countries are coordinating their efforts and exchanging information to prevent outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus. “[Ebola is] a real threat to the entire world,” Rosário Murillo, coordinator of the country’s Communication and Citizenship Council, said October 11. Recommendations to prevent an Ebola outbreak Social welfare officials from the region developed strategies to fight its spread during the 30th Meeting of the Health Sector of Central America and the Dominican Republic (RESSCAD), which was held on October 17 and 18 in San Salvador. In recent months, they had also discussed ways to stop the deadly virus in several video conferences. The preparation has positioned health to deal effectively with Ebola. The Nicaraguan government has already set up an emergency office to counter the epidemic. The country’s health officials will quarantine anyone who in the past 30 days has visited a country with confirmed cases of Ebola; undocumented immigrants and others suspected of infection will also be isolated. The quarantine will last for at least 21 days, which is the incubation period during which symptoms would be apparent in an infected person. Rigorous controls in the Dominican Republic and Suriname Meanwhile, in Panamá and Costa Rica, health authorities are also confident they are ready to respond to cases of Ebola. The Nicaraguan emergency plan also recommends strict health controls at 10 sensitive points of entry to the country. One of them is Peñas Blancas, on the border with Costa Rica, which is sometimes used by African migrants to enter Nicaragua and continue to the United States. Other emergency measures include isolating planes with suspected cases of Ebola and prohibiting people from getting off ships where someone aboard is suspected of being infected with the virus. “Although Panamá is a transit country, the probability that a person with Ebola reaches our territory is quite low,” Panamá’s Health Minister, Francisco Javier Terrientes, said during a working visit to the city of Metetí, in the Darién province, on October 16.“Our ports, airports and borders are being monitored by health officials to identify people who are suspected of potentially having the disease, in order to disprove that possibility.” The Nicaraguan government has already set up an emergency office to counter the epidemic. The country’s health officials will quarantine anyone who in the past 30 days has visited a country with confirmed cases of Ebola; undocumented immigrants and others suspected of infection will also be isolated. The quarantine will last for at least 21 days, which is the incubation period during which symptoms would be apparent in an infected person. “With what we have now, we are prepared [to] prevent a person with symptoms of the Ebola virus from causing an epidemic,” Ricardo Cea Rouanet, director of the Salvadoran Social Security Institute (ISSS), said during the RESSCAD conference. Social welfare officials from the region developed strategies to fight its spread during the 30th Meeting of the Health Sector of Central America and the Dominican Republic (RESSCAD), which was held on October 17 and 18 in San Salvador. In recent months, they had also discussed ways to stop the deadly virus in several video conferences. The preparation has positioned health to deal effectively with Ebola. Honduran health officials have been making their own preparations. To monitor suspected cases of Ebola, Honduras set up the International Health Surveillance Office (OSVI) at the Toncontín International Airport in Tegucigalpa. Such offices will also be installed at airports in the cities of San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba and Roatán. The initiative is part of a national emergency plan, according to a statement from PAHO, which provides technical support to Honduran officials. Suriname is another country barring the entry of travelers who have visited Ebola risk areas. Foreigners who have been in Sierra Leone, Guinea, or Liberia up to 21 days before the date of travel are prohibited from entering the country unless they present an internationally recognized certificate proving they do not carry the disease. Foreigners who have been in the at-risk countries and have already entered Suriname will be monitored or quarantined by health officials on a case by case basis. Rigorous controls in the Dominican Republic and Suriname Following WHO protocols, Salvadoran health officials quarantined the returning soldiers in August and September, and the Congolese missionaries in September and October. But none of the four were found to be infected with Ebola. PAHO recommendations for the region include creating an Ebola emergency fund, surveillance to detect suspected cases in health centers, isolation for patient management, laboratory tests following biosafety protocols, and risk communication – with the public and communicators positioned to publicize information about the disease. The Panamanian government recently allocated $10 million (USD) to adapt the health system for possible cases of the disease. The goal of health authorities is to isolate patients so they pose no risk to the community, according to a statement by the Panamanian Health Ministry. False alarms Surveillance of Ebola at airports “[Ebola is] a real threat to the entire world,” Rosário Murillo, coordinator of the country’s Communication and Citizenship Council, said October 11. Following WHO protocols, Salvadoran health officials quarantined the returning soldiers in August and September, and the Congolese missionaries in September and October. But none of the four were found to be infected with Ebola. For example, in El Salvador, health officials investigated in recent weeks four suspected cases of Ebola involving people who had arrived from Africa. The four people included two Salvadoran soldiers who had joined a peacekeeping mission in Liberia and two nuns from the Democratic Republic of Congo. “Each country must take steps within their jurisdiction, with the resources available,” Carissa Etienne, Director General of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) said after the opening of RESSCAD. Surveillance of Ebola at airports “Although Panamá is a transit country, the probability that a person with Ebola reaches our territory is quite low,” Panamá’s Health Minister, Francisco Javier Terrientes, said during a working visit to the city of Metetí, in the Darién province, on October 16.“Our ports, airports and borders are being monitored by health officials to identify people who are suspected of potentially having the disease, in order to disprove that possibility.” Panamá and Costa Rica ready to deal with Ebola “Costa Rica has faced epidemics of cholera, H1N1 and outbreaks of dengue fever – which, despite generating many cases, has one of the lowest mortality rates in Latin America,” said María del Rocío Sáenz, president of the Costa Rican Social Security Administration (CCSS). “This is due to the efforts we make in early detection.” Suriname is another country barring the entry of travelers who have visited Ebola risk areas. Foreigners who have been in Sierra Leone, Guinea, or Liberia up to 21 days before the date of travel are prohibited from entering the country unless they present an internationally recognized certificate proving they do not carry the disease. Foreigners who have been in the at-risk countries and have already entered Suriname will be monitored or quarantined by health officials on a case by case basis. The government of Guatemala is also working to fight Ebola at airports: it has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, reported Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. center_img Costa Rican has also made preparations: investing in biosafety equipment, designating reference healthcare centers, upgrading surveillance protocols, training health technicians, and conducting public information campaigns. Costa Rican has also made preparations: investing in biosafety equipment, designating reference healthcare centers, upgrading surveillance protocols, training health technicians, and conducting public information campaigns. Like many of its Central American regional neighbors, the Dominican Republic is working to stop Ebola at its borders. The country has adopted an official resolution banning the “entry of people to national territory who, in the last 30 days, have visited any of the countries affected by endemic cases of Ebola and any new countries that the World Health Organization (WHO) may identify.” “We believe that [La Aurora airport] is one of the most likely places for entry by people infected with the virus. Therefore, we are taking basic health care and control measures,” the President of Guatemala, Otto Pérez Molina, told reporters during a visit to the airport to check on the surveillance cameras on October 13. Recommendations to prevent an Ebola outbreak The Panamanian government recently allocated $10 million (USD) to adapt the health system for possible cases of the disease. The goal of health authorities is to isolate patients so they pose no risk to the community, according to a statement by the Panamanian Health Ministry. A low risk remains that the virus could be introduced into the region, but health authorities are remaining vigilant and taking the necessary actions. For example, in El Salvador, health officials investigated in recent weeks four suspected cases of Ebola involving people who had arrived from Africa. The four people included two Salvadoran soldiers who had joined a peacekeeping mission in Liberia and two nuns from the Democratic Republic of Congo. “Each country must take steps within their jurisdiction, with the resources available,” Carissa Etienne, Director General of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) said after the opening of RESSCAD. Meanwhile, in Panamá and Costa Rica, health authorities are also confident they are ready to respond to cases of Ebola. Honduran health officials have been making their own preparations. To monitor suspected cases of Ebola, Honduras set up the International Health Surveillance Office (OSVI) at the Toncontín International Airport in Tegucigalpa. Such offices will also be installed at airports in the cities of San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba and Roatán. The initiative is part of a national emergency plan, according to a statement from PAHO, which provides technical support to Honduran officials. The government of Guatemala is also working to fight Ebola at airports: it has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, reported Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. “With what we have now, we are prepared [to] prevent a person with symptoms of the Ebola virus from causing an epidemic,” Ricardo Cea Rouanet, director of the Salvadoran Social Security Institute (ISSS), said during the RESSCAD conference. I congratulate this protection, on an international level. That is the human proactivity of the leaders of this planet. I think exports of products and objects or items brought from those infected countries should be checked carefully, and they shouldn’t get upset, because not only humans should be checked, but correspondence, express airmail items, bales of clothing and they should have special equipment, for hygienic sanitation, for foreign meats, etc. etc. and the medical scientists should create a special cream to [unintelligible] contagious anti-infection, greet, like the Japanese, with just a nod of the head, not with your hands, avoid physical contact. and may GOD PROTECT THIS PLANET WITH A PROTECTIVE CLOAK FOR OUR BROTHER AFRICA, AND ALL THE COUNTRIES IN THE WORLD. THANK YOU FOR ALLOWING ME TO EXPRESS MY OPINION, I CELEBRATE IT. Central American countries are coordinating their efforts and exchanging information to prevent outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus. The Caribbean country also requires that ships and airlines inform employees at ports and airports of any passengers onboard who have visited countries affected by the disease in the last month. Anyone who presents any symptoms of the disease such as a fever, vomiting or muscle aches will be taken to a “thoroughly equipped” medical facility. “Costa Rica has faced epidemics of cholera, H1N1 and outbreaks of dengue fever – which, despite generating many cases, has one of the lowest mortality rates in Latin America,” said María del Rocío Sáenz, president of the Costa Rican Social Security Administration (CCSS). “This is due to the efforts we make in early detection.” PAHO recommendations for the region include creating an Ebola emergency fund, surveillance to detect suspected cases in health centers, isolation for patient management, laboratory tests following biosafety protocols, and risk communication – with the public and communicators positioned to publicize information about the disease. A low risk remains that the virus could be introduced into the region, but health authorities are remaining vigilant and taking the necessary actions. The Nicaraguan emergency plan also recommends strict health controls at 10 sensitive points of entry to the country. One of them is Peñas Blancas, on the border with Costa Rica, which is sometimes used by African migrants to enter Nicaragua and continue to the United States. Other emergency measures include isolating planes with suspected cases of Ebola and prohibiting people from getting off ships where someone aboard is suspected of being infected with the virus. Like many of its Central American regional neighbors, the Dominican Republic is working to stop Ebola at its borders. The country has adopted an official resolution banning the “entry of people to national territory who, in the last 30 days, have visited any of the countries affected by endemic cases of Ebola and any new countries that the World Health Organization (WHO) may identify.” The Caribbean country also requires that ships and airlines inform employees at ports and airports of any passengers onboard who have visited countries affected by the disease in the last month. Anyone who presents any symptoms of the disease such as a fever, vomiting or muscle aches will be taken to a “thoroughly equipped” medical facility. “We believe that [La Aurora airport] is one of the most likely places for entry by people infected with the virus. Therefore, we are taking basic health care and control measures,” the President of Guatemala, Otto Pérez Molina, told reporters during a visit to the airport to check on the surveillance cameras on October 13. False alarms The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported more than 9,900 cases of Ebola infections. More than 4,500 of those patients have died; almost all of the infections occurred in West Africa. As of late October, however, Central America remains free of the virus — despite several false alarms. The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported more than 9,900 cases of Ebola infections. More than 4,500 of those patients have died; almost all of the infections occurred in West Africa. As of late October, however, Central America remains free of the virus — despite several false alarms. By Dialogo October 24, 2014 Panamá and Costa Rica ready to deal with Ebola last_img read more

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Education provisions in Job Creation Law raise concerns

first_imgThe newly passed Job Creation Law still contains several controversial education provisions that were previously said to have been dropped from the bill following public criticism.The government and the House of Representatives had agreed to remove issues related to the education sector from the bill. However, the final draft of the law, a copy of which has been obtained by The Jakarta Post, includes at least two articles regarding education.Article 26 in page 100 of the draft, under Chapter III on improvement of the investment ecosystem, mentions education and culture among 15 sectors in the business-licensing category. Syaiful said he was worried that the articles could lead to commercialization of the education sector.“I see an effort to commercialize the education sector. We didn’t agree with it from the beginning because this is not in line with the Constitution,” the Islamic-based National Awakening Party (PKB) politician said.A number of House legislators, especially those with close ties to Indonesia’s largest Islamic organization, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), including the PKB, previously opposed the education provisions in the bill, expressing concerns about the requirement for people securing business licenses from the central government to establish educational institutions.House Legislation Body (Baleg) deputy chairman Ahmad Baidowi said on Wednesday that the reason for including Article 65 in the final draft was to accommodate the government’s plan to establish educational institutions in special economic zones (KEK).He highlighted the word “can” in the provision, which means there is no obligation to obtain a business license.“We put the word ’can’ there so they are allowed to obtain a license but are not obliged to do so,” the United Development Party (PPP) politician said.Topics : Furthermore, Article 56 in page 392 stipulates that the implementation of licensing in the education sector “can be carried out through business licensing”, the details of which will be regulated in a separate government regulation (PP).Chairman of House Commission X overseeing education, Syaiful Huda, expressed disappointment over the provisions in the final draft, saying the bill’s working committee had stated that all education provisions would be dropped.”I am disappointed […] I urge educational stakeholders who oppose the article to challenge the law in the Constitutional Court,” he told the press on Tuesday.Read also: Not the right way to do the joblast_img read more

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Gold Coast real estate: Entry-level at Sanctuary Cove

first_img7073 Riverview Cres, Sanctuary Cove. MORE NEWS: Hinterland beauty finally has a buyer 7073 Riverview Cres, Sanctuary Cove from the front. Vendors Virginia and Frank Wyton bought the property in 2009.“It’s a good solid house,” Mrs Wyton said.“Inside there are lots of windows everywhere that look out to the palms and gardens.“In the kitchen there is a main window that looks over the Bali hut and pool — it’s always beautiful and lovely out there.” The residence has four spacious bedrooms and three living areas.“The main bedroom upstairs is very roomy, Mrs Wyton said.“It’s got a walk-in wardrobe that is very convenient.”Other features include the outside terrace, ducted airconditioning and an alarm system.The couple believe the house would make a great home for a family. “It really would suit any age — younger kids or even older kids,” Mrs Wyton said. “It’s so private and you feel like you’re on an island.” Sanctuary Cove is a $2 billion gated masterplanned community at the heart of Hope Island with a reputation for luxury living. MORE NEWS: Could a bath be this house’s selling point? Make a splash in the Bali hut and pool. Inside the residence. Address: 7073 Riverview Cres, Sanctuary CoveAgent: Lindsay Logan, First National Assist — BroadbeachPrice: Offers over $1.25 millionArea: 1497sq mInspections: By appointment 7073 Riverview Cres, Sanctuary Cove. 7073 Riverview Cres, Sanctuary Cove.IF you want to get into the Sanctuary Cove property market without the hefty price tag, here is your opportunity.This three-level house is in need of some TLC but offers an affordable entry-level lifestyle at Sanctuary Cove. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoThe kitchen. ON THE MARKET Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59last_img read more

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FY2020 Conservation and Restoration Partnership Fund Request for Proposals

first_imgThe Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) is accepting proposals for the FY 2020 Conservation and Restoration Partnership Fund until October 18, 2019.This year the Partnership Fund has dedicated $1,000,000 in matching funds for projects addressing coastal conservation and restoration needs.This funding will allow the State, through CPRA, to explore private/public partnership opportunities such as grants and donations to support the implementation of high-priority projects and the advancement of coastal restoration goals.Project Selection CriteriaProjects will be evaluated and prioritized based on the following criteria:Consistency with the objectives of the 2017 State Master Plan;Acreage conserved/restored;Synergy with other conservation/restoration efforts;Project constructability;Matching funds.More Infolast_img read more

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Never again: Wilder can’t beat me – Fury

first_imgTyson Fury has said that  Deontay Wilder can not beat him again.  Fury (30-0-1, 21 K.O.s) believes Wilder (42-1-1, 41 K.O.s) only has a puncher’s chance, which is about as good as any other heavyweight in the division. Promoted ContentA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of ArtThe Adorable Model For Simba In The Lion King RemakeTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black Holes2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Art7 Most Beautiful Indian Top Models Ever9 Movie Scenes That Got Re-Shot Because Viewers Didn’t Like ThemTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World7 Breathtaking Train Stations Around The GlobeBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True The cocky Fury is still drunk on the success of his second fight with Wilder, and he can’t imagine himself not winning. That victory went to Fury’s head, and he now sounds like he feels he’s infallible. It’s Wilder’s job to bring Fury back down to earth to make him realize that he’s not the fighter he thinks he is. It’s up to Wilder to put Fury back in his place and to humble him by sending him down to the first defeat of his career. Wilder knocking out Fury might do some good in the long run because he’s running amok with his mouth lately, saying he’d beat all the great heavyweights in the sport. Fury’s win over Wilder last February may have knocked something out of whack with his thought process for the Gypsy King because he’s not the same person now. Fury plans on sticking with the same trainers that guided him to victory in his second fight against Wilder, 34, last February. In other words, Fury will stick with Andy Lee and Kronk Gym trainer Sugar Hill. Loading… It makes sense for Fury not to dump his training team after his spectacular seventh-round knockout win over Wilder four months ago in Las Vegas, Nevada. What’s interesting is Fury wants to potentially add Wilder’s coach Mark Breland to his team as an additional trainer if he fires him. Wilder hasn’t said anything recently about replacing Breland, so we have to assume that he’ll continue to coach him and work his corner during his fights. read also:WBC proposes talks with Tyson Fury over his status as champion Fury told IFL TV that he bring Breland in as a new trainer if Wilder lets him go. There was speculation that Wilder would release Breland due to him throwing in the towel in his rematch with Fury last February, and he wasn’t happy about it. It would be a wrong move on Wilder’s part to fire Breland because the boxing world has backed the coach, saying that they believe he made the right move in stopping the fight. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Cricket News Delhi ODI: Third time lucky for Adam Zampa, gets Rohit Sharma after being dropped twice

first_imgIndia have not lost an ODI against Australia in New Delhi since 1998.India has not lost an ODI series at home since 2015.Australia has not won a bilateral ODI series since 2017. highlights New Delhi: Australia were building the pressure in their quest to break their ODI rut which has stretched on for two years. Adam Zampa had gotten the major wicket of Vijay Shankar when he hit a six but miscued a short ball to long on to be caught by Usman Khawaja. Rohit Sharma, who had gone past 8000 runs, the joint-second fastest by an Indian and third quickest overall, was the only player to stand in their way. The Mumbai right-hander notched up his 41st fifty and looked good to carry India’s hopes as they looked to stay alive in their chase of 273. The Australian bowlers had bowled brilliant lines and lengths and the asking rate had crept over six. On 52, Rohit tried to nudge a flatter ball that drifted in on leg stump to the fine leg region but he got an inside edge onto the thigh pad. Alex Carey, the wicketkeeper, tried to go for the catch but could not get there. In the very next over bowled by Zampa, with Rohit on 53, the India vice-captain drove a flighted delivery to extra cover but Glenn Maxwell spilled the chance. It seemed today would be Rohit’s day. However, Zampa would be third time lucky and he ultimately got the big wicket of Rohit. The Mumbai right-hander danced down the wicket to a tossed up delivery and looked to slog to deep midwicket, but the bat slipped out of his hand and he was a long way down the pitch. Carey affected a simple stumping and India’s chances of winning the series took a major hit. Rohit slowly trudged back to the pavilion, realising that India’s chances of securing the series faced an uphill task. Earlier, Usman Khawaja’s second ton of the series and backed by a fourth fifty from Peter Handscomb helped Australia reach a solid 272/9. Bhuvneshwar Kumar was the pick of the bowlers with 3/48 and he was well-backed up by Ravindra Jadeja who took 2/45. A win for Australia will give them their first series win in India after 10 years and they will win an ODI series after a gap of two years, when they had won at home 4-1 against Pakistan in 2017.center_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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Syracuse runner Reed Kamyszek hopes to continue athletic career at graduate school

first_imgReed Kamyszek’s dad knew something big had happened. His son had never been one to get very excited.“But when he is excited you can tell,” Eric Kamyszek said, laughing. “He was bouncing off the walls; that’s for sure.”Reed had just been accepted into medical school at Duke University, his “long-shot,” dream school.Kamyszek will leave Syracuse after graduation as one of its most successful runners of all-time, on the course and in the classroom. He ran with the cross-country teams, which won four consecutive conference titles, and he won the 2013 men’s cross-country Elite 89 award, given to the Division-I runner with the highest cumulative grade-point average.He will pursue his doctor of medicine degree at Duke. But he now faces the challenge of continuing to balance running and schoolwork in his life when he knows medical school will be a much harder challenge than his first five years of college.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t (plan on stopping running),” he said. “It’s a lifestyle now; it’s more than just a sport. Stopping it now would be more detrimental than to take on some form of running as it is.”He wants to train with other people. Kamyszek is out of NCAA eligibility and can’t talk to Duke coaches because he’s still running at SU, but he wants to find a central New York satellite team based at Duke to run with. He knows, though, that the workload may complicate things.The medical school classroom expectations will be higher, he said. There will be more information, which he will be expected to comprehend quickly. He will have labs and clinicals — classes where students operate — and lectures.“If undergrad is like drinking out of a garden hose, med-school is like getting the fire-hose thrown at you,” he said.At SU, he balanced the workload of a triple major in psychology, biochemistry and ethics with structure: Wake up at 7 a.m. for a 30-minute team run. Breakfast, then class or tutoring around 9:30. On campus until 1 p.m. doing classwork, research, or more tutoring. Then back to the dorm for 90 minutes until running practice from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. — “Almost like a 40-hour work week,” he said — and after dinner, he does homework until 10 p.m. and lights out at 11 p.m.“Structure helps with the classroom and running,” he said. “The benefits and the mental de-stresser, I’ll definitely try to keep a routine.”Though his schedule won’t arrive until July, he knows classes start around 9 a.m. Kamyszek plans to squeeze in a run or bike ride early in the morning, before class or clinical.He chose Duke, in part, because training early in the morning in North Carolina would be more pleasant than in another place with a climate like Syracuse. Kamyszek, a native of Grand Rapids, Michigan, has lived in snowier areas for his whole life and wants to put on shorts and run in the morning rather than shovel out his car.Kamyszek chose Duke over northern schools like Pittsburgh or State University of New York Upstate Medical University, not just because of the weather, but what he saw on his second visit to Duke.“The professors are not just there to teach you,” he said. “But mentor you as well — kind of like a (running) coach does here at Syracuse.”Kamyszek has heard teasing about his choice of Duke, one of SU’s biggest rivals, from Adam Smith, an assistant coach. Smith, who graduated from rival school North Carolina, says jokingly that the two have “bad blood,” but that Kamyszek is well prepared to balance med-school and running.He’s already done it, Smith said. At SU, Kamyszek trained, tutored his teammates, volunteered at Crouse Hospital and did his own schoolwork.It will be something Kamyszek will have to learn to balance all over again, crafting a new structure under a new schedule.“I’d like to train for another year, year and a half,” Kamyszek said. “But med-school comes first at this point. I’ve had my time of competitive running here at Syracuse.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on May 7, 2015 at 7:58 am Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TRlast_img read more

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U-23 AFCON: [VIDEO]Kwabena Owusu’s missed penalty that handed Cote d’Ivoire victory

first_imgGhana’s Kwabena Owusu missed a crucial penalty as Ghana lost 3-2 on penalties to Cote d’Ivoire in the semi finals of the AFCON U-23 tournament.A win would have qualified the team for next year’s Olympic Games in Tokyo, a first appearance at the multi-sport event in 16 years.After a pulsating 2-2 draw that saw the Black Meteors come back twice to force extra time, the game headed to penalties after extra time failed to separate the West Africans.Ghana took the first kick.Emmanuel Lomotey scored the first kick, and the Ivorians responded.Then Emmanuel Kudjoe missed Ghana’s second kick, and the Ivorians missed too.So 1-1 after two kicks apiece.But after Evans Mensah missed Ghana’s 3rd kick, Hamed Traore converted to give the Ivorians a 2-1 lead.Obeng Junior scored a sumptuous panenka penalty to draw Ghana level but Koffi Kouau restored Cote d’Ivoire’s lead to 3-2 after 4 kicks.Kwabena Owusu stepped up to take the final kick, and he needed to score to keep Ghana in the shoot out.After a decent run up to seemingly commit the goalkeeper, the Leganes forward then kicked a tame effort towards Eliezer Tape’s left, and he made no trouble saving that.It was all over; another penalty shoot out, another defeat for Ghana as Cote D’Ivoire booked a place to the Olympics for the first time in their history.Ghana can still qualify for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games if they win their 3rd place play-off match on Friday.WATCH KWABENA OWUSU’S PENALTY MISS BELOW:⬅️ H I S T O R Y ➡️#TotalAFCONU23 @FIFCI_tweet pic.twitter.com/v243GIKmMK— CAF (@CAF_Online) November 19, 2019last_img read more

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