What Should Bernie Say

first_imgby, Barry Barkan, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesAt town hall meetings and in media interviews, a continuing question for Senator Bernie Sanders has been whether he is too old to be President. So far Bernie has yet to directly answer the question.The discussion of Bernie Sanders’ age will only accelerate as the presidential campaign goes on. This question provides an opportunity to confront society’s last major “…ism”: Ageism and the complex web of negative stereotypes that is internalized in each of us, reinforced socially and provides yet another kind of glass ceiling.In order to take hold, all the liberation movements of our lifetime –such as women and civil and gay rights– have had to challenge the internalization of negative self-images that feed disempowerment and injustice.Like every other marginalized group in society, elders need to be liberated to fully realize our purpose and potential. Denial of our aging and our potential in the second half of life stifles our potential at a time when society desperately needs the emergence of a generation of empowered, loving, wise and committed elders.I just turned 73 and my passion is to join with others to build a movement to restore the role of elder to our culture. Now is the time when the generation that set out to change the world in the sixties is for the most part entering the last third of our life’s journey. And now is the time when our lives, the continuity between generations and perhaps the future of humanity on the earth are calling on us to co-actualize a new vision of what it means to be an elder of the people.So, frequently when people my age ask me what the Elders’ Guild is about, I tell them that our mission is to create the communities where we re-imagine our old age, look after one another and embody the wisdom that will enable us to help heal the future.And I am continually blown away by the frequent response that “maybe my mother will be interested in this.” The river of denial of aging runs deep in the culture. It is fed by an obsession with staying young and avoiding aging. Ironically, it is the unwillingness to engage the process of our own aging with consciousness and commitment to our legacy, that will increase the likelihood of isolation, disconnection from the narrative of our lives and lack of meaning as the years go on.As we kick off 2016 (which seems to have come upon us more quickly than in previous years) the Elders’ Guild will look at how each of us has internalized society’s view of “too old”. Then we will turn our attention to what Bernie might say the next time he is asked if he isn’t too old to be President.The pioneering of an empowered, joyful, juicy and socially engage role for elders is the ultimate antidote to the crushing impact of negative stereotypes of aging.Related PostsThe Lonely Job of Saving American DemocracyI started this post several times yesterday with a long list of what is wrong with our country, our culture, our politics, our government and the terrible direction in which it is all taking us. But if I know TGB…Some Elder PoliticsAs I had a couple of outside obligations on Tuesday, there is just time for a fast overview of a couple of items for today’s post. THE REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION FIELD Perry has peaked but doesn’t seem to know it…Countering Elder Ignorance and DisinterestOn yesterday’s post in regard to Senator Bernie Sanders’ support of elders, Social Security and Medicare, Denise left this comment: “How can we get seniors out there? I’m an insurance agent working with Medicare-related products, so I am talking to…TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Ageism Elders liberationlast_img read more

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Deeper appreciation of kidney disease patients emotional experiences may help improve care

first_img When providers seemed to lack insight into the patient’s experience of illness and treatment, this could engender a sense of mistrust, abandonment, isolation and/or alienation; Patients could also be impacted by how care was organized, which could similarly lead to feelings of mistrust, abandonment, isolation and/or alienation; Patients struggled to make sense of their illness experience, worked to apportion blame, and were quick to blame themselves. Dr. O’Hare noted that the primary focus of the research was on advance care planning, not specifically on patients’ emotional well-being. “As part of our effort to understand how they approach medical decision-making, we wanted to learn about the illness experiences of patients with advanced kidney disease. Our questions were intentionally open-ended and we encouraged patients to talk freely about what was important to them,” she said. “It was striking to us that strong themes emerged related to patients’ emotional experience of illness even though we did not ask any questions that were specifically designed to learn about this.”Related StoriesMetabolomics may be key to identifying diabetes-related kidney diseaseIndigestion remedy improves survival in people with late-stage CKDArtificial intelligence can help accurately predict acute kidney injury in burn patientsThe researchers hope that the findings provide greater awareness of patients’ emotional experience of illness and care. “This is a dimension of chronic illness that can be of immense importance to patients that is often invisible to clinicians. We hope that this work will heighten sensitivity among clinicians, health system leadership, and policy-makers to patients’ emotional experience of illness and the ways in which providers and health systems work may unintentionally contribute to patients’ emotional distress.”In an accompanying Patient Voice editorial, Denise Eilers, BSN, RN, provides a perspective based on her dual roles as a registered nurse and a former home hemodialysis care partner for her husband. She noted that the study is especially timely given the large number of aging baby boomers in society. “That generation, of which I am a member, has been described in various terms such as goal oriented, self sufficient, questioning and involved,” she wrote. “The sheer numbers of these older non-traditional adults will make it necessary to move the needle further toward shared decision making as in the interpretive model. This study offers a guide from which to develop tools to facilitate discussions.” Jun 29 2018For patients with advanced kidney disease, interactions with clinicians and with the wider health system, combined with patients’ own struggle to understand their illness, can exact a large emotional toll. The findings, which come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), indicate that a deeper appreciation of patients’ emotional experiences may offer important opportunities to improve care.Like patients with many other forms of chronic illness, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must deal with challenging symptoms and a limited life expectancy. Prior studies have shown that they may experience their illness and care in ways that might be surprising to clinicians. When a team led by and Ann O’Hare, MA, MD (VA Puget Sound Health Care System, the University of Washington, and the Kidney Research Institute, a collaboration between Northwest Kidney Centers and UW Medicine, Seattle) and Janelle Taylor, PhD interviewed 27 patients with late stage CKD, 3 themes related to patients’ emotional experience of care and illness emerged:center_img Source:https://www.asn-online.org/last_img read more

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Clinical judgment of doctors not reliable to predict MRH in older adults

first_imgJul 2 2018Medication-related harm (MRH) is common in older adults following hospital discharge. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study has examined whether doctors can predict which older patients will experience MRH requiring care following hospital discharge, and whether clinical experience and confidence in prediction influence the accuracy of predictions.The study found that clinical judgment of doctors is not a reliable tool to predict MRH in older adults post-discharge.In the multicenter observational prospective study involving five teaching hospitals in England between September 2013 and November 2015, there were 1066 patients with completed predictions and follow-up. Doctors discharging older patients from medical wards predicted the likelihood of their patient experiencing MRH requiring care in the initial 8 week period post-discharge.Related StoriesStudy looks at impact of hospital readmissions penalties on targeted surgical conditions’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyMost predictions (85%) were made by junior doctors with less than 5 years’ clinical experience. There was no relationship between doctors’ predictions and patient MRH, irrespective of years of clinical experience. Doctors’ predictions were more likely to be accurate when they reported higher confidence in their prediction, especially in predicting MRH-associated hospital readmissions.”These findings confirm the complexity of predicting medication-related harm.This makes it very challenging to target medication-related strategies to the right individuals,” said Dr. Khalid Ali, chief investigator of the study and senior lecturer in Geriatrics at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. “Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics teaching has not been particularly prominent in undergraduate medical training. This is perhaps an area requiring review, given an aging population that is prescribed ever increasing quantities of medicine.” Dr. Ali added that there is a need to consider new approaches to identify individuals at high risk of medication-related harm given its serious impact on patients and health care services. Source:https://www.bps.ac.uk/news-events/news/articles/2018/can-doctors-identify-older-patients-at-risk-of-medlast_img read more

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NIH officials highlight growing threat of tickborne diseases

first_img Source:https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/tickborne-diseases-are-likely-increase-say-nih-officials Jul 26 2018The incidence of tickborne infections in the United States has risen significantly within the past decade. It is imperative, therefore, that public health officials and scientists build a robust understanding of pathogenesis, design improved diagnostics, and develop preventive vaccines, according to a new commentary in the New England Journal of Medicine from leading scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).Bacteria cause most tickborne diseases in the United States, with Lyme disease representing the majority (82 percent) of reported cases. The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is the primary cause of Lyme disease in North America; it is carried by hard-bodied ticks that then feed on smaller mammals, such as white-footed mice, and larger animals, such as white-tailed deer. Although there are likely many factors contributing to increased Lyme disease incidence in the U.S., greater tick densities and their expanding geographical range have played a key role, the authors write. For example, the Ixodes scapularis tick, which is the primary source of Lyme disease in the northeastern U.S., had been detected in nearly 50 percent more counties by 2015 than was previously reported in 1996. Although most cases of Lyme disease are successfully treated with antibiotics, 10 to 20 percent of patients report lingering symptoms after effective antimicrobial therapy. Scientists need to better understand this lingering morbidity, note the authors.Tickborne virus infections are also increasing and could cause serious illness and death. For example, Powassan virus (POWV), recognized in 1958, causes a febrile illness that can be followed by progressive and severe neurologic conditions, resulting in death in 10 to 15 percent of cases and long-term symptoms in as many as 70 percent of survivors. Only 20 U.S. cases of POWV infection were reported before 2006; 99 cases were reported between 2006 and 2016.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedThe public health burden of tickborne disease is considerably underreported, according to the authors. For example, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme disease annually in the U.S. but estimates that the true incidence is 10 times that number. According to the authors, this is due in part to the limitations of current tickborne disease surveillance, as well as current diagnostics, which may be imprecise in some cases and are unable to recognize new tickborne pathogens as they emerge. These limitations have led researchers to explore new, innovative diagnostics with different platforms that may provide clinical benefit in the future.It is also critical that scientists develop vaccines to prevent disease, the authors write. A vaccine to protect against Lyme disease was previously developed, but was pulled from the market and is no longer available. Future protective measures could include vaccines specifically designed to create an immune response to a pathogen, or to target pathogens inside the ticks that carry them.By focusing research on the epidemiology of tickborne diseases, improving diagnostics, finding new treatments and developing preventive vaccines, public health officials and researchers may be able to stem the growing threat these diseases pose. In the meantime, the authors suggest, healthcare providers should advise their patients to use basic prevention techniques: wear insect repellant, wear long pants when walking in the woods or working outdoors, and check for ticks.last_img read more

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China to create its own DARPA

first_imgHeeding Chinese President Xi Jinping’s calls for his country to get serious about innovation to buoy its faltering economy, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) is bringing military R&D back under its oversight and launching a new agency modeled after the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), ScienceInsider has learned.China is joining a trend in Asia: Japan has launched a DARPA-like agency, and South Korea is planning one, too. “It is natural that China and other countries are trying to establish DARPA-like organizations that can marry cutting-edge science and technology for defense applications,” says Richard Weitz, director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at the Hudson Institute, a think tank in Washington, D.C. But whether China can succeed is an open question, he asserts, as DARPA’s success—the Internet is its most famous creation—is rooted in U.S. protection of freedom of expression. China has one big advantage, he says: It’s “very effective in acquiring advanced technology from foreign businesses through cyber and other means.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe As part of Xi’s reorganization of the armed forces to focus on five theaters of operation, China has formed a new science and technology committee to manage defense R&D. According to a spokesperson for China’s Ministry of Defense, the committee, known in Chinese as junweikejiwei, is designed to meet the needs of China’s ongoing military modernization. The committee will strengthen management of defense science and technology, promote indigenous innovation in national defense, and coordinate integrated development of military and civilian technologies, the spokesperson says. China’s central government plans to spend $147 billion on defense this year; the amount allotted to defense R&D is a state secret. “Nobody knows how much is spent on military R&D,” says Dennis Blasko, a former Army attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The new committee resurrects strong central government oversight of defense R&D. Modern China’s founder, Mao Zedong, established a national defense science committee in 1958 to drive development of atomic weapons. In 1982, it was folded into a civilian commission charged with coordinating national defense research activities at nonmilitary ministries. Xi has brought oversight of R&D back to the military; the junweikejiwei reports to the Communist Party’s Central Military Commission, which Xi chairs. The new committee is headed by Liu Guozhi, an applied physicist and academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. An expert on high power microwaves, he formerly commanded the Malan nuclear test base in Xinjing, China, and was deputy director of the dissolved PLA General Armaments Department. Liu’s committee is now creating the DARPA-like agency under it, according to a source who requested anonymity. The source did not provide details about the agency’s planned size, scope and budget, or when it will begin operating.last_img read more

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To reduce student suspensions teachers should try being more empathetic

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) School suspension rates have nearly tripled in the United States since the 1970s, rising from just 3.7% of all students in 1974 to nearly 11% in 2011. That’s a big deal because missed class means missed learning, and suspensions can predict future unemployment and even incarceration. Now, a new study suggests that even a minor attitude adjustment among teachers can have a dramatic effect on those rates: Math teachers encouraged to be more empathetic saw student suspensions drop by half.Psychologist Jason Okonofua, who led the new study, spent his early years attending public school in Memphis, Tennessee. In 10th grade, his good grades landed him a spot at a prep school in Rhode Island. When he arrived, Okonofua was struck by how differently the teachers responded to their students—if a student felt something was wrong and spoke out, for example, teachers would encourage him to voice his opinions. The same behavior in his former school would likely have landed the kid in trouble for talking back. “They were totally different approaches,” he says.That experience made Okonofua—now at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California—curious about how student-teacher relationships predict student success. Although many factors figure into the likelihood of suspension, one of the most reliable is whether a student has been suspended before. One possible explanation for that, Okonofua says, is that a student’s first suspension leads to a breakdown in trust and respect for their teachers, triggering a vicious cycle of more misbehavior and more suspensions. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email The researchers’ first step: see whether they could affect teachers’ mindsets toward their students, making them either more punitive or empathetic. They split 39 K–12 teachers from five California public schools into two groups and randomly assigned them to read one of two research articles: one that said “good teacher-student relationships are critical for students to learn self-control” and another that said “punishment is critical for teachers to take control of the classroom.” Next, they asked teachers to explain how they would discipline a hypothetical student named Darrell, who did annoying things such as getting up to throw away trash in the middle of class rather than waiting for permission or a break. Teachers who read the punitive article recommended more than 1.5 times as many disciplinary actions for Darrell—sending him to the hall or the principal, for example. Teachers who read the empathetic article, in contrast, recommended about 1.5 times as many nonpunitive responses, like talking to him and asking whether there were anything he needed.Next, the team tested whether the results would hold up for teachers and students in the real world of middle school. They targeted 31 California math teachers in part because math class is a place where “a lot of relationships break down,” as many children struggle with the subject, he says. The 1682 students in the study were racially and socioeconomically diverse, with up to 70% enrolled in free or reduced-price lunch programs.One group of math teachers completed a short online exercise emphasizing empathy, which included readings about research that showed how caring relationships with adults contributed to student success. It also included writing prompts in which teachers shared their insights about empathy in the classroom. For example, one teacher wrote: “I feel I need to earn my students’ respect and trust. I know many of them have had poor experiences with past teachers so I need to prove to my students that I am there for them and will not let them fail.” A second group completed a similar exercise. But instead of empathy, they read and wrote about the importance of technology to student development.The team tracked suspension rates for a year after the exercises. By examining official school records, they found that 9.8% of students whose teachers had done the technology exercise had been suspended. In contrast, only 4.6% of students whose math teacher had completed the online exercise on empathy were suspended, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Although the findings need to be replicated with other teachers at other schools, the study suggests that “by changing the mindset of just one of their teachers, students had better behavior across all of their classes,” Okonofua says.The findings clearly demonstrate that how teachers view their students’ needs can have a direct impact on student performance, says Frank Worrell, an educational psychologist at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. They also highlight the importance of teacher expectations, he says. “Those who too quickly decide that a student is a troublemaker will be less successful in helping that student gain an education.”Although there are “scores” of studies showing that students with better relationships with their teachers have better outcomes, “what is exciting about this study … is that we are now beginning to get insights into systematic approaches we might take to actually improve these relationships,” adds Hunter Gehlbach, an educational psychologist at UC Santa Barbara.last_img read more

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Top stories The Breakthrough of the Year a heartbreaking ghost octopus story

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Ripples in spacetime: Science’s 2016 Breakthrough of the YearThe discovery of ripples in spacetime—gravitational waves—shook the scientific world this year. It fulfilled a prediction made 100 years ago by Albert Einstein and capped a 40-year quest to spot the infinitesimal ripples. But instead of the end of the story, scientists see the discovery as the birth of a new field: gravitational wave astronomy. Runners-up for 2016’s Breakthrough of the Year include lab-grown human embryos, the discovery of the exoplanet next door, and portable DNA sequencers. Also be sure to check out our favorite science news stories of 2016  along with the top images of the year.Pregnancy resculpts women’s brains for at least 2 years Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A first-of-its-kind study has revealed that the architecture of women’s brains changes strikingly during their first pregnancies, in ways that last for at least 2 years. In particular, gray matter shrinks in areas involved in processing and responding to social signals. This may mean that new mothers’ brains are more efficiently wired in areas that allow them, for instance, to respond to their infant’s needs or to detect threatening people in their environments.‘Ghost octopus’ has heartbreaking parenting strategyA little white octopus, dubbed “Casper,” was discovered in March of this year when a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration submarine robot found it in a singular sighting. In a study published this week in Current Biology, researchers report that this species (which is so new, it doesn’t have a scientific designation) has a unique—and rather sad—parenting strategy.Deep probe of antimatter puts Einstein’s special relativity to the testAfter decades of effort, physicists have probed the inner workings of atoms of antihydrogen—the antimatter version of hydrogen—by measuring for the first time a particular wavelength of light that they absorb. The advance opens the way to precisely comparing hydrogen and antihydrogen and, oddly, testing the special theory of relativity—Albert Einstein’s 111-year-old theory of how space and time appear to observers moving relative to one another, which, among other things, says that nothing can move faster than light.U.S. physics society removes chief lobbyist after controversial press release on Trump’s electionThe American Physical Society (APS) has dumped its longtime lobbyist, one of the most visible spokespeople for the scientific community, within days of angry reactions from some members to the society’s congratulatory message to President-elect Donald Trump. Michael Lubell was director of public affairs and head of the Washington, D.C., office of the 53,000-member APS, which is based in nearby College Park, Maryland. In his 22 years at APS, Lubell earned a reputation for giving blunt assessments of political developments.Now that you’ve got the scoop on this week’s hottest Science news, come back Monday to test your smarts on our weekly quiz!last_img read more

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Watch rain and shadows from Saturns rings give the planet a funky

first_img If you’ve ever picked up a radio broadcast from thousands of kilometers away, you’ve interacted with Earth’s ionosphere, the layer of our atmosphere that reflects radio signals and helps protect us from solar radiation. Saturn has a dense ionosphere, too, one that has similarities and differences to our own, some of the final data from NASA’s Cassini mission reveal. Before it plunged into the planet as part of its “Grand Finale” in September, the spacecraft took measurements as it passed inside Saturn’s enormous rings. These rings affect the way the ionosphere is charged, researchers report today in Science. When the probe passed into the shadow Saturn’s two largest and brightest rings—the A and B rings—cast on the planet, the amount of ionized plasma dropped immensely, meaning the ionosphere is far less active while in the ring shadow. However, there is still a small amount of plasma movement in this shadow zone. This extra activity may be coming from Saturn’s innermost ring: the D-ring. Researchers theorize that ring rain, an interaction where charged water particles migrate from the rings to the ionosphere, may explain this phenomenon. Good news for any future saturnian ham radio operators. Watch rain and shadows from Saturn’s rings give the planet a funky ionosphere By Andrew WagnerDec. 11, 2017 , 4:00 PMlast_img read more

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To find small asteroids that could hit Earth private foundation embraces small

first_img To find small asteroids that could hit Earth, private foundation embraces small satellites Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe (GRAPH) J. YOU/SCIENCE; (DATA) PAUL CHODAS/JET PROPULSION LABORATORY Last week, an asteroid the size of Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza whizzed by Earth, missing it by half the distance to the moon. The concern that we may one day not be so lucky has long preoccupied the B612 Foundation, a private organization in Mill Valley, California, dedicated to finding asteroids that cross Earth’s orbit and could devastate humanity. B612 itself had a near-death experience 3 years ago, when its bold plans for an asteroid-hunting space telescope fell apart. But now, its ambitions are rising again with a new technique for finding menacing objects.On 10 May, B612 announced a partnership with York Space Systems, a Denver-based maker of standard 85-kilogram satellites, to investigate building a fleet of small asteroid hunters. For many years, B612—which takes its name from the asteroid home of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s Little Prince—aimed to build and launch a much larger craft, Sentinel, a $450 million space telescope with a 50-centimeter mirror. In 2012, NASA agreed to provide logistical support. But fundraising stalled and, in 2015, the agency ended its agreement with B612 because it wasn’t meeting mileposts, essentially killing the telescope. Now, B612 has developed a new technique to do the same thing at a far lower cost with small space telescopes. Ed Lu, B612’s co-founder, expects the first telescope to cost about $10 million and believes a full constellation “would be a factor of many, many cheaper” than Sentinel.Some asteroid astronomers are skeptical of the new approach, saying the technology is far from proven. “To be very, very blunt, what they are proposing and what they’ve demonstrated is not going to help us find more NEOs [near-Earth objects],” says astronomer Timothy Spahr, CEO of space consultancy firm NEO Sciences in Marlborough, Massachusetts, who does independent work for NASA.  Artist rendering of an ICEYE SAR and Commercial Optical Telescope spacecraft being developed with York Space Systems Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The B612 Foundation is partnering with York Space Systems to build a fleet of small asteroid-spotting satellites. By Adam MannMay. 22, 2018 , 3:30 PM On the hunt Congress has tasked NASA with finding 90% of near-Earth asteroids bigger than 140 meters. Most of the biggest are known. Organizations like the B612 Foundation are trying to make progress on smaller ones. Astronomers believe they have already discovered 95% of the NEOs of civilization-ending size, a kilometer or more across. But ones between 140 meters and 1 kilometer across—still big enough to wipe out a city—are so faint that an estimated 59% remain undiscovered. Finding them, and perhaps developing plans for diverting threats, requires a big telescope, like Sentinel, or long exposures on a smaller one. But if the asteroids are moving fast, they shift from pixel to pixel on the telescope’s camera, and the long exposures provide little benefit.In 2013, astronomer Michael Shao of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, and his colleagues outlined a technique called synthetic tracking, which gets around this issue by taking up to 100 snapshots in a single second. A dim asteroid won’t appear in any particular image, but by arranging and stacking the photos in thousands of combinations, the system can get lucky and preferentially brighten an unknown fast-moving object. Email Doing this for an unknown asteroid of unknown brightness and speed at an unknown point in the sky is computationally demanding. But Shao says advanced processing power makes it feasible. He adds that the technique would help a small telescope do as good a job as a bigger one, even though it gathers less light. It could also help uncover the fastest moving asteroids, such as the object ‘Oumuamua, an interstellar asteroid spotted zipping through the solar system last year.Shao and his team simulated how nine 20-centimeter telescopes in orbit around the sun would fare with the technique. In a 2015 study, they projected that the constellation could discover 90% of Earth-grazing asteroids 50 meters or larger in diameter in 5 years, three times faster than other techniques and faster than Sentinel itself. Shao says within a week of publishing his paper, B612 contacted him.Last year, B612 tested the technique in space by asking the Earth-observing company Planet to turn one of its SkySat satellites around and aim its 35-centimeter telescope at already known asteroids. By applying synthetic tracking, the team could tease out images of the faint objects.Now, B612 needs to raise money for its new plan. But the asteroid-hunting field is becoming more crowded. Starting in 2021, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, an enormous 8.4-meter observatory in Chile, will photograph large parts of the sky each night and could increase the number of known NEOs from about 18,000 to more than 100,000. NASA would also like to build the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam), a space-based mission that would replicate many of Sentinel’s goals and abilities. Although the mission was not selected in a competition last year, it was given money for continued study, a sign that it might one day fly.Lindley Johnson, NASA’s planetary defense officer in Washington, D.C., says NEOCam could launch 4 years after it’s given the go-ahead, and that it would likely be better at finding asteroids than B612’s constellation. He says synthetic tracking is good for detecting fast-moving objects near Earth, like debris and satellites, but won’t work as well for faint and distant objects. “I think they are overoptimistic in their assessments,” he says. Shao, however, says experts at JPL have assured him that small satellites can provide the power, computation, and communications needed for synthetic asteroid tracking to work.Mark Sykes, CEO and director of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, says any of these asteroid missions could pay off for research as well as for planetary protection. Spotting asteroids passing closer than the moon, like the 15 May object, would allow researchers to explore at close range objects that hail from the distant solar system. “We would have a one-stop shopping center for sampling material that has formed throughout the solar system,” he says, adding that asteroid mining companies would also be interested in such near-Earth targets.Lu shares those hopes. He wants B612 to compile nearby asteroids in a user-friendly catalog, like a Google Maps for the solar system—a step that he says would help future scientists, explorers, and miners. “If you buy into the idea that humans will someday live and work and economically operate in space, then you need a map,” he says. *Correction, 23 May, 5 p.m.:  Ed Lu’s role at B612 has been clarified.last_img read more

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Piranhalike teeth and torn fins reveal ancient fish fight

first_imgThe Jura-Museum, Eischstatt, Germany Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email This 150-million-year-old fish (seen as an artist’s illustration) wasn’t named after the piranha for nothing. It apparently used its long, dagger-shaped teeth to slice into other fish, according to a new study, as evinced by the slashed tailfins of some victims found nearby.Researchers first discovered the animal—christened Piranhamesodon pinnatomus (pinnatomus means “fin cutter”)—in 2016 in the same southern German limestone deposits as the famous feathered dinosaur Archaeopteryx. Most other fish in the shallow sea where P. pinnatomus lived had teeth adapted for crushing, not biting or tearing. (Their stomach contents suggest they ate hard-shelled prey such as clams and sea urchins.)The scientists think P. pinnatomus might have used “aggressive mimicry” the way modern-day piranhas do—even though they belong to a different branch of the fish family tree. Piranhas today resemble their more peaceable relatives, allowing them to get close enough to unsuspecting prey that they can tear off a fin. (The attack doesn’t kill the prey, and fins can regrow.) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Piranhalike teeth and torn fins reveal ancient fish fight Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Gretchen VogelOct. 18, 2018 , 11:00 AM P. pinnatomus, too, resembles other fish found nearby—except for those teeth. The fossil is the oldest bony fish known that would have been able to cut flesh out of larger prey, the team reports today in Current Biology. The researchers say it’s a striking example of evolution inventing some of the same tricks twice.last_img read more

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ETH Zurich starts process to dismiss professor accused of bullying students

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ETH Zurich in Switzerland has set in motion a procedure to dismiss astronomy professor Marcella Carollo. The university announced the move today after receiving the results of an independent investigation into allegations that she bullied students. “The final report confirms this is a case of unacceptable behavior which we do not tolerate,” ETH President Lino Guzzella said in a statement. The allegations came to light a year ago, when a Swiss newspaper reported Carollo had mistreated students over more than a decade and that the university had ignored complaints about her behavior. A few months earlier, the university had quietly dissolved the Institute for Astronomy where Carollo had worked. (Her husband, astronomer Simon Lilly, had been director of the institute for several years.) Carollo was on sabbatical for the second half of 2017, and she has not returned to her duties as a professor. © ETH Zurich/Gian Marco Castelberg Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email By Gretchen VogelOct. 31, 2018 , 3:00 PM Carollo issued a statement through her lawyer saying that she had been the target of a smear campaign started by a student whose performance she found inadequate. The statement says it is “noteworthy” that “the university has not found it necessary to take similarly serious measures” after investigations involving male professors. She said she “will use all means at her disposal” to defend herself against attempts to dismiss her. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe ETH Zurich The final decision on Carollo’s status rests with the university’s board of directors. According to university regulations, the university will now appoint a committee to “review whether a dismissal is appropriate” and make a recommendation to the board. The university president will also weigh in. ETH Zurich starts process to dismiss professor accused of bullying studentslast_img read more

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Artificial intelligence could diagnose rare disorders using just a photo of a

first_img By Frankie SchembriJan. 7, 2019 , 11:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country FDNA Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Artificial intelligence could diagnose rare disorders using just a photo of a face Rare disorders often show up in someone’s appearance. Individuals with Noonan syndrome—a genetic condition that inhibits the body’s growth and development—can have wide-set eyes, for example, and those with Bain type intellectual disability—caused by a mutated gene on the X chromosome—sport almond-shaped eyes and small chins (see above). Now, researchers have trained artificial intelligence to recognize these features, paving the way for early—and cheap—diagnoses.Scientists built a computer program, DeepGestalt, and trained it on a publicly available data set of more than 17,000 photos of patients affected by more than 200 rare disorders. The program then used deep learning to recognize which patterns of markers were linked to hundreds of different genetic syndromes.In a test with 502 new images, DeepGestalt successfully placed the correct syndrome in its top 10 list 91% of the time, the researchers report today in Nature Medicine. The program also outperformed doctors in spotting patients with Angelman syndrome and Cornelia de Lange syndrome—an inherited genetic mutation that can cause, among other symptoms, low-set ears and an upturned nose—versus other disorders, and in separating patients with different genetic subtypes of Noonan syndrome. Email The researchers say the tool could one day be used in combination with genome testing to help doctors search for specific genetic markers and more quickly home in on an accurate diagnosis. This could help reduce the time, cost, and emotional burden of the “diagnostic odyssey” on which millions of families embark each year, seeking care for someone with a rare genetic syndrome.Given how easy it is to photograph a face, the tool could be abused by employers or insurance providers, the researchers acknowledge. They say proper regulation of the distribution and use of tools like DeepGestalt will be crucial. Click to view the privacy policy. 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Wave of horse deaths on famed racetrack stumps scientists

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Riders arrive at the Santa Anita track in Southern California on 8 March. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A horse’s age, sex, and racing experience can all affect its risk of injury, as can preexisting stress fractures. Some experts also suspect veterinary drugs. Joe Pagan, president of Kentucky Equine Research in Versailles, recently found that furosemide, used to stop airway hemorrhaging as a result of exertion, and omeprazole, a treatment for stomach ulcers, both affect calcium excretion and absorption, which could theoretically weaken bones; the Stronach Group, which owns Santa Anita, recently said it would ban the use of drugs on racing days. But Pagan says a connection to the injuries is “a big stretch.” Others have noted that more than 90% of racehorses nationwide have stomach ulcers, and most are treated with furosemide, so the drugs’ effects wouldn’t be limited to Santa Anita.Instead, many scientists think something about Santa Anita’s dirt track must be to blame. After the 21st death this season, the Stronach Group invited Mick Peterson of the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory, a nonprofit organization in Lexington, Kentucky, to study the problem. Peterson ran chemical and x-ray diffraction studies on track samples, testing, among other things, the soil’s density, moisture content, and mineralogical qualities.He also examined the consistency of the track’s layers. The top layer, called the cushion, is soft and granular, to dampen the impact on the horse’s foot; the one below, called the pad, is harder and more compact, allowing for more “push-off ” of the hoof. (Below that are two more layers called the hardpan and the base.) Horses probably adjust to different surfaces as long as they’re consistent, Peterson says, but injuries could result if the track characteristics change from stride to stride. His team brought in a machine, towed behind a vehicle, that mimics a galloping horse’s forelimb plunging into the track and collects data on deceleration, sliding, surface elasticity, and energy absorption. They also used ground penetrating radar to measure the depths of the layers every 10 centimeters along the track. By Christa Lesté-LasserreMar. 27, 2019 , 3:20 PM None of the tests revealed anything unusual. “There’s nothing that we know, based on what we know, that’s wrong with the track,” Peterson says. Santa Anita reopened its tracks on 11 March, after his results had come in; within days a 3-year-old filly sustained fractures in both forelimbs and was euthanized, and the shutdown resumed.Peterson says current testing methods could miss problems with moisture management on the dirt track. The cushion layer works best when it contains about 14% water, he says. Track managers have an array of techniques for managing moisture, such as sealing water out during wet weather by rolling the surface overnight, or “harrowing” and watering the track during dry weather to offset evaporation. But moisture levels can still change dramatically throughout a race day, especially when heavy rainfall alternates with bright sun and desert winds. Complicating matters further, Santa Anita’s grandstand casts a large, evolving shadow across part of the dirt track. The departure of Dennis Moore, a seasoned surface manager who retired from Santa Anita in December 2018, may also have played a role, although it’s not clear how much practices have changed since then. “If the maintenance wasn’t perfect, that may have been a factor,” Peterson says.Peterson is now studying how well different management techniques work after rainstorms. Necropsies of the fallen horses may also offer clues by revealing whether certain types of injury were more common.Santa Anita officials didn’t respond to Science’s request for comment. But they have evidently decided they can’t wait for science to come up with definitive answers. Moore has been brought back as a consultant, and as Science went to press, Santa Anita was slated to reopen on 29 March. SANTA ANITA PARK Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The Southern California racetrack famous for historic wins by thoroughbred greats such as Seabiscuit, John Henry, and Zenyatta is struggling to explain a series of fatal accidents in horses. In less than 3 months, 22 horses have died on the Santa Anita tracks in Arcadia, most of them from catastrophic limb fractures, leading managers to shut it down on 14 March.The string of fatalities has spurred outcries from animal welfare activists and caused major economic loss—but it also mystifies scientists who study horse racing and racetracks. Some believe heavy rainfall may have caused irregular compaction of the dirt track layers, increasing the risk of fractures when horses’ hooves penetrate the ground at high speeds. “Dirt tracks are particularly dangerous because they can seem fine on the surface but hide the compaction deep below,” says Nathalie Crevier-Denoix of the French National Institute of Agricultural Research and the National Veterinary School in Alfort, near Paris. But a battery of tests by U.S. experts has failed to show anything unusual.Injuries so serious they cause death or require immediate euthanasia because they can’t be repaired occur on every racetrack. The most common type is a fracture of the front fetlock, a hinge joint between the foot and the lower leg bones that is “an important shock absorber, like airplane landing gear,” says Susan Stover, a veterinary researcher at the University of California, Davis. At Santa Anita, the catastrophic injury rate has doubled compared with last year. IRFAN KHAN/LOS ANGELES TIMES/GETTY IMAGES Wave of horse deaths on famed racetrack stumps scientists Researchers used a machine that mimics a galloping horse foot to do biomechanical tests on Santa Anita’s dirt track.last_img read more

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Fierce storms hit Greece killing six foreign nationals

first_img In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief By Reuters |Athens | Published: July 11, 2019 1:55:37 pm Television footage showed strong winds sweeping through a restaurant in the Halkidiki peninsula, a region popular with tourists in the summer.Streets in towns in the area were dotted with uprooted pine trees and overturned motorcycles, photographs posted on websites showed. “It is the first time in my 25-year career that I have lived through something like this,” Athanasios Kaltsas, director of the Nea Moudania Medical Centre, where many of the injured were treated for fractures, told Greek television. “It was so abrupt, and so sudden,” he said.Kaltsas said patients taken to the clinic ranged in age from 8 months to over 70. Some suffered head injuries from trees and other falling objects.Two elderly Czech tourists were killed when strong winds and water swept away their travel trailer, police said.Elsewhere in the region, a woman and an 8-year-old boy, both Romanian nationals, were killed after a roof collapsed on a restaurant in Nea Plagia. A man and a young boy, both Russians, died after a tree collapsed near their hotel in the seaside town of Potidea, authorities said. Such severe weather is unusual in Greece, where summers are typically hot and dry. Meteorologist Klearxos Marousakis described conditions as “extremely unusual” for this time of year. Meteorologists forecast it would continue to rain in the area until about 9 a.m. on Thursday.Authorities declared Halkidiki in a state of emergency, and Greece’s newly appointed citizens’ protection minister was due to visit early on Thursday. At least 140 firefighters were operating in the area. Post Comment(s) Advertising Six foreign nationals killed as severe weather hits Greece An overturned vehicle is seen on a beach at Sozopoli village in Halkidiki region, northern Greece, Thursday. (AP)Six foreign nationals, including two children, were killed and more than 100 other people injured after gale-force winds, rain and hailstorms struck northern Greece late on Wednesday, uprooting trees and collapsing roofs, authorities said. Top News NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook last_img read more

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Why is WeLoveBeef trending

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Top News 25 Comment(s) Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Condemning the incident, Tamil Nadu CPI(M) urged for stringent action against the accused. The party added that while such attacks were happening on Dalits and Muslims in North India, “the state government and police should nip such episodes in the bud” in Tamil Nadu.“Those behind the murderous attack should be given stringent punishment,” the party’s state unit Secretary K Balakrishnan said in a statement in Chennai. Advertising By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 12, 2019 10:34:21 pm Advertising The victim, who was identified as Mohammed Faisan, hails from Poravachery and had posted the picture on Facebook on Thursday describing its taste. The accused objected to the post and went to Faisan’s house on Thursday night to question him about his picture, police said. The questioning soon turned ugly, and a quarrel ensued between them after which Faisan was attacked by the group.Netizens sharply reacted to the incident and got both the hashtags trending on the social media website by sharing pictures of beef dishes.#WeLoveBeef beef is my favourite..Eating beef is my rights. pic.twitter.com/zshByz1fcf— gopinath baijo (@gopynath2) July 12, 2019Beef gravy 🐄😋#Beef4life 🐄😋#WeLoveBeef 😍🐄😋 pic.twitter.com/mDRF2QRCcg— Idhayath (@Idhayath7) July 12, 2019#Beef Fry…Always my favourite.#Beef4life #WeLoveBeef pic.twitter.com/Xwdex8DBhv— Elwinston (@elwinston_x) July 12, 2019The 24-year-old sustained injuries and was admitted to a government hospital in Nagapattinam. The District Superintendent of Police T K Rajasekaran ordered for a police case to be registered and arrested the accused— Dinesh Kumar (28), Agathian (29), Ganeshkumar (27) and Mohankumar (28)— on Friday. The case was registered under various sections of the Indian Penal Code, including attempt to murder. Why is #WeLoveBeef trending? Though four people have been arrested in connection with the case, people took to Twitter to express their outrage over the incident and started trending #WeLoveBeef and #Beef4Life hashtags. (Source: Flickr/by avlxyz)A man belonging to a minority community was allegedly attacked by a group of men in Tamil Nadu’s Nagapattinam district for uploading a picture while consuming beef soup, news agency PTI quoted police officials Friday. Though four people have been arrested in connection with the case, people took to Twitter to express their outrage over the incident and started trending #WeLoveBeef and #Beef4Life hashtags.last_img read more

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Angiotensin receptor blockers improve sodium excretion in blacks

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 13 2018Drugs that inhibit a hormone that constricts blood vessels also help improve sodium excretion in blacks who hold onto too much sodium in the face of stress, investigators report.The drugs are angiotensin receptor blockers and the study appears to be the first to look at their impact on sodium excretion in sodium retainers, investigators report in the journal Ethnicity & Disease.It’s also some of the first evidence in humans that the innate system that enables us to flee danger may itself be dangerous to our cardiovascular health. And, that targeting that system may be an effective strategy for some high blood pressure patients.”This puts the pieces together and opens up the opportunity for a better treatment strategy for individuals who are sodium retainers and who, like most of us, often find themselves stressed,” says Dr. Gregory Harshfield, director of the Georgia Prevention Institute at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.Harshfield, corresponding author on the new study, has previously shown that about 30 percent of blacks and 15 percent of whites hold onto more salt – about the same amount found in a serving of fast food French fries – than others in response to stress. They continue to hold onto it after the stress that activated their innate protective system has passed, which can drive daytime blood pressures up and keep nighttime pressures too high as well.He’s been looking for more answers about why and treatment strategies that target the problem.Sodium retention is regulated by the kidneys and a natural way the body responds to stress. It’s part of the fight-or-flight survival mechanism that gets the heart pounding and the body moving quickly when needed, Harshfield says. But as with most things, too much can be bad.Studies in lab animals with a propensity for too much sodium retention indicate the reaction starts with stress activating the sympathetic nervous system in the kidneys, increasing the amount of sodium the kidneys retain rather than excrete.Related StoriesResearchers develop DNA nanorobots that target breast cancer cellsLiving with advanced breast cancerGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”One way it does this is by activating angiotensin II, a stress hormone and powerful constrictor of blood vessels, which in turn activates aldosterone, a hormone that prompts the kidneys to hold onto sodium. Like stress, obesity also can set this unhealthy chain of events into motion.The study looked at 87 healthy blacks ages 18 to 50. While none of the participants were hypertensive at the time of the study, the investigators documented that 25 of the participants held onto more sodium with stress.For seven days, participants received either a placebo or irbesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker currently prescribed alone or in combination with other drugs to treat high blood pressure. It’s also used to treat kidney disease in patients with diabetes.To produce mild mental stress, participants played a video game that offered a cash reward.Investigators found that treatment with irbesartan improved sodium excretion in the sodium retainers during both stress and rest.Systolic blood pressure, the pressure inside blood vessels when the heart beats, was actually decreased about five points during stress in the retainers following treatment with the angiotensin receptor blocker.The drug did not significantly impact sodium excretion in the non-retainers.Similar studies are needed in black and white individuals who already are hypertensive and hold onto too much sodium, Harshfield says.One in three American adults have hypertension, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and only about half of those individuals have their blood pressure under control. High blood pressure puts you at risk for heart disease and stroke, which are leading causes of death in the United States. A blood pressure of less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury is considered normal, according to the CDC and American Heart Association. Source:https://www.augusta.edu/mcg/last_img read more

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UA receives grant to provide sexual assault nurse examiners training

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 29 2018The Western Region Public Health Training Center at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, in collaboration with the UA College of Nursing, has received a $1.49 million, three-year federal grant to provide sexual assault nurse examiners training and certification to expand services to sexual assault victims in rural areas.Sexual assault nurse examiners are registered nurses who have completed specialized education and clinical preparation in the medical forensic care of patients who have experienced sexual assault or abuse. The regional training center provides free training and continuing education for the public health workforce in Region 9 of the Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, covering the states of Arizona, California, Nevada, Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliated Pacific islands.In Region 9, many rural communities lack access to certified sexual assault nurse examiners. The funding for the training program is provided by the Health Resources and Services Administration Advanced Nurse Education Sexual Nurse Assault Examiner program.”We focus on the areas that have limited resources to obtain training,” said Douglas Taren, PhD, professor and associate dean of academic programs at the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health and director of the Western Region Public Health Training Center. “In addition to training nurses, we will work with local authorities to strengthen the infrastructure to provide individuals access to sexual assault exams and support for our students to work with local schools and community organizations to educate the public about relationship violence and sexual assault.”Faculty members from the UA College of Nursing will teach the online courses. The curriculum will prepare practicing registered nurses and graduate nursing students for the International Association of Forensic Nurses exam.”Nurses require special training to effectively manage the nuances of working with individuals who have been sexually assaulted,” said Rene Love, PhD, clinical associate professor and director of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at the College of Nursing. “The UA College of Nursing is very excited to collaborate with the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health to promote this training and education in rural and underserved areas so that nurses can be prepared to provide sexual assault examinations. The training can be completed online, but two of our qualified faculty members also visit underserved areas to provide on-the-ground training in areas that need it most.”Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchWVU researcher investigates how nursing homes can best meet obese residents’ healthcare needsAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysAbigail Stoica, associate director of the Western Region Public Health Training Center, said more than 138,000 public health professionals have registered for courses through the center since 2015.”The Western Region Public Health Training Center is an incredible resource for health departments and community agencies throughout the United States,” said UA President Robert C. Robbins, MD. “The collaboration between the College of Public Health and the College of Nursing allows for the sharing of resources that will help nurses better serve rural communities. While it is crucial that we work toward prevention of sexual assault, it is vitally important that there are nurses who are specifically trained to work with people who have experienced sexual assault or abuse, and I am very proud of this program. It is a perfect example of our university’s commitment to improve and protect the health of people here in Arizona and across the nation.”Patricia Haynes, PhD, CBSM, associate professor and licensed clinical psychologist, and Lisa Zhang, applications systems analyst and developer at the College of Public Health, will work to develop online methods to support the mental health of the students in the program who in turn work with victims of sexual assault. Source:https://opa.uahs.arizona.edu/newsroom/news/2018/ua-provide-free-training-increase-number-certified-sexual-assault-nurse-examinerslast_img read more

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First surgery in the US to implant device for knee osteoarthritis

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 3 2019Surgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are the first in the U.S. to implant a new device designed to relieve knee pain and help people with osteoarthritis prevent or delay knee replacements.For the millions who suffer with the daily pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis, treatments to slow the progression of the disease are limited. A clinical trial is testing the Calypso Knee System and the device’s ability to extend the functional life of the joint, thus allowing patients to remain active without knee pain.”This device works like a shock absorber to take pressure off the inside of the knee while creating a cushion similar to what cartilage provides in a healthy joint,” said Dr. David Flanigan, orthopedic surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center who performed the surgery. “The hope is that it increases joint functionality, reduces pain and delays a total knee arthroplasty for years or even decades.”Related StoriesArthroscopy more accurate than MRI for chondral defects of the knee, study findsLow-income patients at increased risk of catastrophic amputation after knee joint replacementCommon traits keep many patients with knee cartilage issues from participating in clinical trialsDeveloped by Moximed Inc., the device is designed to treat the symptoms of osteoarthritis on the inner knee, the most commonly affected area. Without altering the anatomy or removing tissues or bone from the knee itself, the implant absorbs excess knee loads that cause pain in osteoarthritic joints.”We hope this will be an opportunity for patients with osteoarthritis to remain active without pain for a much longer period of time,” Flanigan said.Researchers will study approximately 80 trial participants who receive the implant. Ohio State Wexner Medical Center is one of only four sites in the trial.If the trial is successful, Flanigan expects the device could soon be available to patients across the country.Knee osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage in the joint wears away, causing stiffness and pain that continues to get worse with time. Current treatment options, largely for end stage osteoarthritis, often involve invasive surgical procedures that permanently change the knee structure. While effective, removing bone or tissue can limit patients’ future treatment options.More than 700,000 knee replacement surgeries are performed in the U.S. every year, a number that continues to grow. Flanigan said the device could help reverse that trend, helping more people avoid joint replacements and preserve their knees.”A total knee replacement is truly permanent. You’ve removed the bone and there’s really no going back at that point,” Flanigan said. “People are really looking for other options to help them remain active and extend the life of their joint as much as possible before having a knee replacement.” Source:http://osuwmc.multimedia-newsroom.com/index.php/2019/01/03/first-ever-surgery-tests-system-to-prevent-knee-replacements/last_img read more

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UVA researchers shed light on why C difficile infections are so dangerous

first_imgWhen we, as a lab, started working on this, we were actively discouraged from working on C. difficile because [some] people in the field thought that, oh, this is a toxin-mediated disease. You don’t need to understand anything more than the fact that the bacteria make toxins. So, it’s been a wonderful opportunity for us because we went in and we sort of countered the prevailing wisdom. Yes, the toxins are important, but the toxins are important because they affect the immune system in dramatic ways.”UVA’s William A. Petri Jr., MD, PhD Researchers Mahmoud Saleh (left) and William A. Petri Jr. have shed light on why C. difficile infections are so dangerous.The new finding from the University of Virginia School of Medicine explains why certain patients are highly susceptible to C. diff infections, provides doctors with a way to predict disease severity and points to a new way to treat the often-deadly condition.The UVA researchers found that the immune response to C. diff causes tissue damage and even death through a type of immune cell called Th17. This solves a longstanding mystery about why disease severity does not correlate with the amount of bacteria in the body but, instead, to the magnitude of the immune response. It also explains why patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are more likely to suffer severe C. diff infections and more likely to die from them.Lingering EffectsThe bowel condition colitis, the researchers determined, has a lingering effect on the immune system, priming the patient for a worse C. diff infection. While scientists have known that C. diff and other bacteria produce toxins that are harmful to the body, they assumed this was a simple matter: more toxin, more sickness. But UVA’s research reveals that the truth is far more complex. Oftentimes, the type of immune response generated by the body can dictate the outcome of disease independently of bacterial toxin. Preventing C. diffThe research also suggests a potential new way to treat or prevent severe C. difficile relapses.Petri said: Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseSeeking to understand why patients with IBD are so susceptible to C. diff, researcher Mahmoud Saleh created a mouse model of colitis, one of the common forms of IBD. He was able to determine that mice that recovered from colitis actually had changes in their immune system – an adaptive immune response. Immune cells known as Th17 cells had become hypercharged, primed to cause a severe reaction to subsequent C. difficile infection. Even the same amount of the bacteria would now cause a dangerous, outsized response. “If we infect a month later, we see that these [T helper cells] alone can cause severe infection,” Saleh said. “So, these cells are sufficient for that increased severity of C. difficile infection.”The researchers then looked at human samples to determine if their finding would hold true. It did, and they were able to use substances in the blood, including a protein known as interleukin 6 (IL-6), to predict disease severity. Patients with high amounts of IL-6 were almost eight times more likely to die from C. difficile than those with low levels.Petri, of UVA’s Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, explained: Apr 23 2019A new discovery about dangerous C. difficile diarrhea has identified a new way that the bacteria – and possibly others like it – cause severe disease. C. diff is the most common hospital-acquired infection and estimated to result in 453,000 cases per year, with 29,300 associated deaths.center_img Now we know from Mahmoud’s work that if I, as a physician, measure IL-6 in one of my patients with IBD, I’ll be able to know how severe disease will be in that person and I can make the decision about whether the person needs to be admitted to the hospital … or even go to the intensive care unit.” While more research will need to be done to create such a treatment, Petri and Saleh are proud to have solved a big mystery about C. difficile. “When you look at how much bacteria are growing or how much toxin is being produced, a lot of time there is no direct correlation,” Saleh said. “Now we know that what’s making that difference is this immune response.”Source: https://newsroom.uvahealth.com/2019/04/22/revealed-the-secret-superpower-that-makes-c-difficile-so-deadly/ We know that in mice by targeting T cells we protect from disease, and that leads to the question, could we do something similar and people to provide better therapy? It is an interesting and terrible situation right now that C. diff is not resistant to antibiotics but is resistant to treatment. And so even though we have very, very good antibiotics for this, the [body’s] response is so severe that even though we’re killing the bacteria with the antibiotics, patients are suffering from their own immune response.”last_img read more

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